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I am a JAVA dev who try to learn C++ and I don't really know what is the best practice for standard function declaration.

In the class:

class Clazz
{
 public:
    void Fun1()
    {
        //do something
    }
}

Or outside:

class Clazz
{
public:
    void Fun1();
}

Clazz::Fun1(){
    // Do something
}

I have the feeling that the second one can be less readable...

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4  
Perhaps a beginner's book on C++ might be in order? –  Brian Roach Jan 31 '12 at 7:32
4  
@Downvoters why? what is wrong with my question? –  JohnJohnGa Jan 31 '12 at 7:34
2  
Research Effort. The question you are asking isn't just a matter of style / readability. C++ is not Java, and how you declare things makes a difference. You really do need to start with a good book / tutorials. –  Brian Roach Jan 31 '12 at 7:35
    
There are actually 3 options here. Your second example could have the function definition in the header file (but still not inlined), or in a separate .cpp file. –  Cody Gray Jan 31 '12 at 7:41
    
This question might help you understand. –  Björn Pollex Jan 31 '12 at 7:46

6 Answers 6

C++ is object oriented, in the sense that it supports the object oriented paradigm for software development. However, differently from Java, it's not object obsessed and you are not forced to use a class for everything.

The standard C++ way for declaring a function is to just declare a function, without any class.

If instead you are talking about method declaration/definition then the standard way is to put just the declaration in an include file (normally named .h or .hpp) and the definition in a separate implementation file (normally named .cpp or .cxx). I agree this is indeed somewhat annoying and requires some duplication but it's how the language was designed.

For quick experiments and single file projects anything would work... but for bigger projects this separation is something that is practically required.

Note that if you know Java then C++ is a completely different language... and it's a language that cannot be learned by experimenting. The reason is that it's a rather complex language with a lot of asymmetries and apparently illogical choices and that, most important, when you make a mistake there are no "runtime error angels" to save you like in Java... but there are instead "undefined behavior daemons".

The only reasonable way to learn C++ is by reading... no matter how smart you are there is no way you can guess what the committee decided (actually being smart is sometimes even a problem because the correct answer is illogical and a consequence of historical heritage).

Just pick a good book or two and read them cover to cover.

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The first defines your member function as an inline function, while the second doesn't. The definition of the function in this case resides in the header itself.

The second implementation would place the definition of the function in the cpp file.

Both are semantically different and it is not just a matter of style.

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cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/classes gives the same answer: "The only difference between defining a class member function completely within its class or to include only the prototype and later its definition, is that in the first case the function will automatically be considered an inline member function by the compiler, while in the second it will be a normal (not-inline) class member function, which in fact supposes no difference in behavior." –  Buttons840 Feb 24 '13 at 1:10

Function definition is better outside the class. That way your code can remain safe if required. The header file should just give declarations.

Suppose someone wants to use your code, you can just give him the .h file and the .obj file (obtained after compilation) of your class. He does not need the .cpp file to use your code.

That way your implementation is not visible to anyone else.

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The "Inside the class" (I) method does the same as the "outside the class" (O) method.

However, (I) can be used when a class is only used in one file (inside a .cpp file). (O) is used when it is in a header file. cpp files are always compiled. Header files are compiled when you use #include "header.h".

If you use (I) in a header file, the function (Fun1) will be declared every time you include #include "header.h". This can lead to declaring the same function multiple times. This is harder to compile, and can even lead to errors.

Example for correct usage:

File1: "Clazz.h"

//This file sets up the class with a prototype body. 

class Clazz
{
public:
    void Fun1();//This is a Fun1 Prototype. 
};

File2: "Clazz.cpp"

#include "Clazz.h" 
//this file gives Fun1() (prototyped in the header) a body once.

void Clazz::Fun1()
{
    //Do stuff...
}

File3: "UseClazz.cpp"

#include "Clazz.h" 
//This file uses Fun1() but does not care where Fun1 was given a body. 

class MyClazz;
MyClazz.Fun1();//This does Fun1, as prototyped in the header.

File4: "AlsoUseClazz.cpp"

#include "Clazz.h" 
//This file uses Fun1() but does not care where Fun1 was given a body. 

class MyClazz2;
MyClazz2.Fun1();//This does Fun1, as prototyped in the header. 

File5: "DoNotUseClazzHeader.cpp"

//here we do not include Clazz.h. So this is another scope. 
class Clazz
{
public:
    void Fun1()
    {
         //Do something else...
    }
};

class MyClazz; //this is a totally different thing. 
MyClazz.Fun1(); //this does something else. 
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The first one must be put in the header file (where the declaration of the class resides). The second can be anywhere, either the header or, usually, a source file. In practice you can put small functions in the class declaration (which declares them implicitly inline, though it's the compiler that ultimately decides whether they will be inlined or not). However, most functions have a declaration in the header and the implementation in a cpp file, like in your second example. And no, I don't see any reason why this would be less readable. Not to mention you could actually split the implementation for a type across several cpp files.

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Member functions can be defined within the class definition or separately using scope resolution operator, ::. Defining a member function within the class definition declares the function inline, even if you do not use the inline specifier. So either you can define Volume() function as below:

class Box {

public:

  double length;

  double breadth;    
  double height;     

  double getVolume(void)
  {
     return length * breadth * height;
  }

};

If you like you can define same function outside the class using scope resolution operator, :: as follows

double Box::getVolume(void) {

return length * breadth * height;

}

Here, only important point is that you would have to use class name just before :: operator. A member function will be called using a dot operator (.) on a object where it will manipulate data related to that object only as follows:

Box myBox;

myBox.getVolume();
(from: http://www.tutorialspoint.com/cplusplus/cpp_class_member_functions.htm) , both ways are legal.

I'm not an expert, but I think, if you put only one class definition in one file, then it does not really matter.

but if you apply something like inner class, or you have multiple class definition, the second one would be hard to read and maintained.

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Can you bring the relevant content from that link into the body of your post, and thus future-proofing against dead links? Thanks –  JustinJDavies Sep 10 at 18:54

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