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Good afternoon all,

I was wondering what's the reason that

public class test<T> {
    T[] backing_array;

    public void a(int initial_capacity) {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        T[] backing_array = (T[]) new Object[initial_capacity];
        this.backing_array = backing_array;
    }
}

is valid but

public class test<T> {
    T[] backing_array;

    public void b(int initial_capacity) {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        this.backing_array = (T[]) new Object[initial_capacity];
    }
}

is a syntax/compiler error?

What's the reason that we have to use an intermediary variable for @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") ?

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mmm..same here but if you moved the SuppressWarning to before the class block, it is fine though.. +1 for this. –  Jasonw Jan 31 '12 at 7:58
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

the @SuppressWarnings("unchecked") is applied on the scope of the declaration and assignment right after it. It can be assigned to functions' scope, or a specific variable's assignment.
In your first example, it is applied on the local variable. In the 2nd example, you're trying to apply it on an assignment of a field that was already declared.

See that this also doesn't compile:

public class Test<T> {

    public void a(int initial_capacity) {
        T[] backing_array;
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        backing_array = (T[]) new Object[initial_capacity];
    }
}

and this has no effect on warnings:

public class Test<T> {

    public void a(int initial_capacity) {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        T[] backing_array;
        backing_array = (T[]) new Object[initial_capacity];
    }
}

In short, SuppressWarnings cannot be applied on a variable's throughout its scope. It's applied on an assignment+decleration (for variables) or on the entire method's scope when applied on a method.

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Because you can only annotate:

  • classes
  • methods
  • variables
  • parameters
  • packages

You cannot annotate expressions or statements.

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And sometimes only a subset of those if the @Target(ElementType[]) annotation is used. –  WChargin Jun 2 '13 at 5:24
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Compiles OK for me (simplified to remove irrelevant code):

public static class Test<T> {
    T[] array;

    public void a() {
        @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
        T[] a = (T[]) new Object[1];
        this.array = a;
    }

    @SuppressWarnings("unchecked")
    public void b() {
        this.array = (T[]) new Object[1];
    }
}

The only observation of note is that the @SuppressWarnings goes on the method rather than the code line in b() due to the suppression being on a field assignment rather than local variable assignment

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deleted an earlier comment, which was written prior to your edit :) +1 for a nice explanation –  posdef Jan 31 '12 at 8:03
    
@Bohemian but for my case there are other statements in the method b and I would like to keep SuppressWarnings as scoped as possible. –  Pacerier Jan 31 '12 at 8:10
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