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Is this how you define a function in jQuery?

$(document).ready( function () {
    var MyBlah = function($blah) { alert($blah);  };
 });

Now to call the function I do:

MyBlah('hello');
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6  
nitpick: you don't "define a function in jQuery", since jQuery is just a library, not the language. in fact it doesn't even qualify as a framework, it's just a library. (a great library) –  Javier May 25 '09 at 19:02
    
Maybe he meant a JQuery plugin? –  Pablo Fernandez May 25 '09 at 21:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 63 down vote accepted

First of all, your code works and that's a valid way of creating a function in JavaScript (jQuery aside), but because you are declaring a function inside another function (an anonymous one in this case) "MyBlah" will not be accessible from the global scope.

Here's an example:

$(document).ready( function () {

    var MyBlah = function($blah) { alert($blah);  };

    MyBlah("Hello this works") // Inside the anonymous function we are cool.

 });

MyBlah("Oops") //This throws a JavaScript error (MyBlah is not a function)

This is (sometimes) a desirable behavior since we do not pollute the global namespace, so if your function does not need to be called from other part of your code, this is the way to go.

Declaring it outside the anonymous function places it in the global namespace, and it's accessible from everywhere.

Lastly, the $ at the beginning of the variable name is not needed, and sometimes used as a jQuery convention when the variable is an instance of the jQuery object itself (not necessarily in this case).

Maybe what you need is creating a jQuery plugin, this is very very easy and useful as well since it will allow you to do something like this:

$('div#message').myBlah("hello")
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1  
a perfect explanation, thank you. –  hd. Aug 15 '12 at 6:27
    
jQuery Plugin link broken. Here is an alternative: re-cycledair.com/creating-jquery-plugins –  Mark Sep 26 '12 at 12:52

No, you can just write the function as:

$(document).ready(function() {
    MyBlah("hello");
});

function MyBlah(blah) {
    alert(blah);
}

This calls the function MyBlah on content ready.

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No.

You define the functions exactly the same way you would in regular javascript.

//document ready
$(function(){
    myBlah();
})

var myBlah = function(blah){
    alert(blah);
}

Also: There is no need for the $

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You can extend jQuery prototype and use your function as a jQuery method.

(function($)
{
    $.fn.MyBlah = function(blah)
    {
        $(this).addClass(blah);
        console.log('blah class added');
    };
})(jQuery);

jQuery(document).ready(function($)
{
    $('#blahElementId').MyBlah('newClass');
});

More info on extending jQuery prototype here: http://api.jquery.com/jquery.fn.extend/

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That is how you define an anonymous function that gets called when the document is ready.

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4  
Just to clarify why people probably downvoted your answer: The function isn't anonymous as it is assigned to a variable and second, the function doesn't get called when the document is ready as it is only assigned, not called. –  I.devries May 25 '09 at 20:06
    
J.Pablo is correct: an anonymous function is assigned to a variable within a closure, and second this closure is invoked when the DOM is ready. –  Lo Sauer Sep 29 '11 at 19:29

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