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It's a simple question, but the solution appears to be far from simple. I would like to know how to convert from UTC to local time. I am looking for a solution in C that's standard and more or less guaranteed to work on any computer at any location.

I have read the following links carefully but I can't find a solution there:

Converting string containing localtime into UTC in C

Converting Between Local Times and GMT/UTC in C/C++

I have tried a number of variations, such as (datetime is a string with time and date in UTC):

strptime(datetime, "%A %B %d %Y %H %M %S", tp);
strftime(printtime, strlen(datetime), "%A %B %d %Y %H %M %S", tp);

Or

strptime(datetime, "%A %B %d %Y %H %M %S", tp);
lt=mktime(tp);
printtime=ctime(&lt);

No matter what I try printtime ends up being the same as UTC.

Edit 11-29-2013: based on the very helpful answer by "R" below I finally got around to create a working example. I found it to be working correct in the two timezones I tested it, CET and PST:

#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

long long diff_tm(struct tm *a, struct tm *b)
{
  return a->tm_sec - b->tm_sec
          +60LL*(a->tm_min - b->tm_min)
          +3600LL*(a->tm_hour - b->tm_hour)
          +86400LL*(a->tm_yday - b->tm_yday)
          +(a->tm_year-70)*31536000LL
          -(a->tm_year-69)/4*86400LL
          +(a->tm_year-1)/100*86400LL
          -(a->tm_year+299)/400*86400LL
          -(b->tm_year-70)*31536000LL
          +(b->tm_year-69)/4*86400LL
          -(b->tm_year-1)/100*86400LL
          +(b->tm_year+299)/400*86400LL;
}


int main()
{
  time_t utc, local;
  char buf[100];
  const char datetime[]="2013 11 30 23 30 26 UTC"; /* hard coded date and time in UTC */

  struct tm *tp=malloc(sizeof(struct tm));
  if(tp==NULL)
    exit(-1);

  struct tm *localt=malloc(sizeof(struct tm));
  if(localt==NULL)
    exit(-1);

  memset(tp, 0, sizeof(struct tm));
  memset(localt, 0, sizeof(struct tm));

  printf("UTC date and time to be converted in local time: %s\n", datetime);

  /* put values of datetime into time structure *tp */
  strptime(datetime, "%Y %m %d %H %M %S %z", tp);

  /* get seconds since EPOCH for this time */
  utc=mktime(tp);
  printf("UTC date and time in seconds since EPOCH: %d\n", utc);

  /* lets convert this UTC date and time to local date and time */

  struct tm e0={ .tm_year = 70, .tm_mday = 1 }, e1, new;
  /* get time_t EPOCH value for e0 (Jan. 1, 1970) */
  time_t pseudo=mktime(&e0);

  /* get gmtime for this value */
  e1=*gmtime(&pseudo);

  /* calculate local time in seconds since EPOCH */
  e0.tm_sec += utc - diff_tm(&e1, &e0);

  /* assign to local, this can all can be coded shorter but I attempted to increase clarity */
  local=e0.tm_sec;
  printf("local date and time in seconds since EPOCH: %d\n", local);

  /* convert seconds since EPOCH for local time into localt time structure */
  localt=localtime(&local);

  /* get nicely formatted human readable time */
  strftime(buf, sizeof buf, "%Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S %Z", localt);

  printf("local date and time: %s\n", buf);
}

It should compile without problems on most systems. I hard coded a time and date in UTC which then will be converted to the local time and date.

share|improve this question
    
Can we assume POSIX (since you use strptime) or just plain C? –  R.. Jan 31 '12 at 8:52
    
Sorry missed that, yes you can assume POSIX. –  aseq Feb 2 '12 at 9:41
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you can assume POSIX (and thus the POSIX specification of time_t as seconds since the epoch), I would first use the POSIX formula to convert to seconds since the epoch:

tm_sec + tm_min*60 + tm_hour*3600 + tm_yday*86400 +
    (tm_year-70)*31536000 + ((tm_year-69)/4)*86400 -
    ((tm_year-1)/100)*86400 + ((tm_year+299)/400)*86400

Next, use localtime((time_t []){0}) to get a struct tm representing the epoch in local time. Add the seconds since the epoch to the tm_sec field of this struct tm, then call mktime to canonicalize it.

Edit: Actually the only POSIX dependency is having a known epoch which (time_t)0 corresponds to. Perhaps you can find a way around that if you really need to... for instance using calls to both gmtime and localtime at time_t 0..

Edit 2: A sketch of how to do this:

#include <time.h>
#include <stdio.h>

long long diff_tm(struct tm *a, struct tm *b)
{
        return a->tm_sec - b->tm_sec
                +60LL*(a->tm_min - b->tm_min)
                +3600LL*(a->tm_hour - b->tm_hour)
                +86400LL*(a->tm_yday - b->tm_yday)
                +(a->tm_year-70)*31536000LL
                -(a->tm_year-69)/4*86400LL
                +(a->tm_year-1)/100*86400LL
                -(a->tm_year+299)/400*86400LL
                -(b->tm_year-70)*31536000LL
                +(b->tm_year-69)/4*86400LL
                -(b->tm_year-1)/100*86400LL
                +(b->tm_year+299)/400*86400LL;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        char buf[100];
        struct tm e0 = { .tm_year = 70, .tm_mday = 1 }, e1, new;
        time_t pseudo = mktime(&e0);
        e1 = *gmtime(&pseudo);
        e0.tm_sec += atoi(argv[1]) - diff_tm(&e1, &e0);
        mktime(&e0);
        strftime(buf, sizeof buf, "%c", &e0);
        puts(buf);
}

Please don't mind the ugly output code. This program takes an argument in the form of "seconds relative to the POSIX epoch" and outputs the resulting time in local time. You can convert any UTC time to seconds since the epoch using the formula I cited above. Note that this code does not in any way depend on POSIX, but it does assume the offset returned by diff_tm combined with the seconds-since-the-epoch value does not overflow int. A fix for this would be to use a long long offset and a loop that keeps adding increments no larger than INT_MAX/2 (or smaller than INT_MIN/2) and calling mktime to renormalize until the offset reaches 0.

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2  
Regarding edit: surely it's not true in general that the delta between UTC and localtime at the epoch was the same as the delta at the time you're converting. Maybe in Japan. –  Steve Jessop Jan 31 '12 at 9:33
    
@Steve: It doesn't need to be the same. The only reason you need to compute it is to get the adjustment to the offset in seconds from the "epoch" in localtime so you can make the denormalized struct tm in localtime format then pass it to mktime for normalization. –  R.. Jan 31 '12 at 17:29
    
See my edit.... –  R.. Jan 31 '12 at 18:07
    
Thank you for that answer. I will try it out and let you know how it turned out. –  aseq Jan 31 '12 at 20:27
    
BTW, it's really sick that C makes you go to such lengths to work with standardized time in a sane way. Just having a UTC equivalent of the mktime function would avoid the whole issue. At least the above approach can be used to make such a function... –  R.. Jan 31 '12 at 20:50
show 11 more comments

To sum-up: the conversion of a broken down date (struct tm) in UTC to a (local) calendar time (time_t) is achieved with timegm() - the opposite of mktime() - BUT timegm() is not a standard function (how logic is that). The C standard leaves us with only time(), gmtime(), mktime() and difftime().

A workaround found in other docs advises to emulate timegm() by setting first the environment variable TZ to a null string, then calling mktime() resulting in an UTC calendar time, then resetting TZ to its initial value, but once again, this is not standard.

Basically, as I understand it, the difference between a local time and UTC time is just an offset so if we can evaluate that offset, we can adjust the result of mktime(), so here's my proposition:

time_t my_timegm(struct tm *tm) {
    time_t epoch = 0;
    time_t offset = mktime(gmtime(&epoch));
    time_t utc = mktime(tm);
    return difftime(utc, offset);
}

A quick test:

int main(void) {
    time_t now = time(0);
    struct tm local = *localtime(&now);
    struct tm utc = *gmtime(&now);
    time_t t1 = mktime(&local);
    time_t t2 = my_timegm(&utc);
    assert(t1 == t2);
    printf("t =%lu\nt1=%lu\nt2=%lu\n",now,t1,t2);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is wrong if you are currently in DST. mktime(gmtime(X)) does not gives you the current applicable offset, but the timezone offset (so you'll likely miss one hour in summer if DST is on). –  xryl669 Apr 5 '13 at 9:27
    
Also, it's important to remember that mktime is not re-entrant (and unlike localtime & gmtime, it's not obvious from the function signature), since it modifies the global timezone variable. So this code might appear to work, but any other thread that's doing a mktime can completely break your output. –  xryl669 Apr 5 '13 at 9:30
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void   CTestDlg::OnBtnTest()   
{ 
HANDLE   hFile; 
WIN32_FIND_DATA   wfd; 
SYSTEMTIME   systime; 
FILETIME   localtime; 
char   stime[32];     //
memset(&wfd,   0,   sizeof(wfd)); 

if((hFile=FindFirstFile( "F:\\VC\\MFC\\Test\\Release\\Test.exe ",        &wfd))==INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE) 
{ 
char   c[2]; 
DWORD   dw=GetLastError(); 
wsprintf(c,   "%d ",   dw); 
AfxMessageBox(c);   
return   ;//
} 
FileTimeToLocalFileTime(&wfd.ftLastWriteTime,&localtime); 
FileTimeToSystemTime(&localtime,&systime); 
sprintf(stime, "%4d-%02d-%02d   %02d:%02d:%02d ", 
      systime.wYear,systime.wMonth,systime.wDay,systime.wHour, 
      systime.wMinute,systime.wSecond); 
AfxMessageBox(stime);   
} 
share|improve this answer
3  
a) thats not C, b) explain to me where FindFirstFile() is in C99 standard. What a crap answer –  Adrian Cornish Jan 31 '12 at 8:37
    
It would appear you never actually read the question. not to mention your code relies on a particular path and directory structure being present to work. try harder to work within the questions parameters next time. –  Matt Rogers Mar 5 '12 at 22:14
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