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I was reading the apple documentation for memory management, and came across something that I just don't understand. Basically, I don't understand why one does not need need to retain an instance variable through the "getter" method. I wrote this little program to see what would happen. I thought there would be a crash, but I am obviously missing something.

//  main.m
//  Test
//


#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>
#import "Test.h"

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    NSAutoreleasePool *p = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

    //Initialize the test object
    Test *t = [[Test alloc] init];

    //Set the value to 5
    [t setMyNum:[NSNumber numberWithInt:5]];

    //Save a temp number that points to the original number
    NSNumber *tempNum = [t myNum];

    //release old number and retain new
    [t setMyNum:[NSNumber numberWithInt:7]];

    //Shouldn't this crash because tempNum is pointing to a deallocated NSNumber???
    NSLog(@"the number is %@",tempNum);

    [p drain];
    return 0;
}

Doesn't tempNum point to a deallocated object??

All help is appreciated.

EDIT

This is the code in the getter and setter methods

#import "Test.h"


@implementation Test
- (void)setMyNum:(NSNumber *)newNum {
    [newNum retain];
    [myNum release];
    myNum = newNum;
}

-(NSNumber *)myNum {
    return myNum;
}
@end

As you can see I am calling release on the old object.

EDIT

It was suggested, and I thought rightfully so that the reason the tempNum is still around is because it hadn't been autoreleased from the pool yet. But even after moving the [pool drain] to right before the NSLog message, there is not crash??? Weird.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since you are not explicitly releasing any objects, nothing is being deallocated until the autorelease pool is allowed to drain. Try inserting [p drain] before the last NSLog call. It should crash the NSLog call.

Additionally, if you are not retaining the NSNumber in your setMyNum: method, you will find that it will crash if you add [p drain] before tempNum is assigned.

To clarify the original question, calling a getter method doesn't (and shouldn't) necessarily imply that the caller wants to take ownership (i.e. retain) the variable. If that was the case, this code would leak:

NSLog("Number is %@", [t myNum]);

Also, it appears that NSNumber has an optimization whereby for small numbers, they cache the NSNumber objects, retain an extra copy, and return that version. So for small constants, [NSNumber numberWithInt: N] will return an object with 2 reference counts (available via [theNumber retainCount]). To explicitly see what happens, use a larger constant in the program, an NSNumber will retain a 'fresh' object with a reference count of 1 (that will also be autoreleased).

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But in my setMyNum I am explicitly calling retain and release. What happens to the old number after I call release? –  esiegel May 25 '09 at 18:51
1  
release doesn't deallocate the object, it simply subtracts one from the "retain count" of that object. it's only when the retain count hits 0 that the object is deallocated. In your case, the number (NSNumber representing 5) has a retain count of 1 straight after being created, then gets incremented to 2 when it is set in your Test object, then gets decremented back to 1 when another NSNumber (representing 7) gets set in the Test object. –  harms May 25 '09 at 18:56
    
I don't think that this is totally correct: I tried inserting a [p drain] before the NSLog call expecting a crash, but no crash??? There must be something else retaining the value?? Still confused –  esiegel May 25 '09 at 19:05
    
Well for exploratory purposes (but never for application logic) you can ask an object for it's retain count thus: [someObject retainCount]. There you can explore how it goes up and down as fewer or more other objects have a handle on it. –  harms May 25 '09 at 19:07
2  
Ok, it looks like NSNumber caches some NSNumber objects (i.e. it keeps them class-level and retains an extra copy of them) for small integers. Try numberWithInt:654321. That will crash it! –  Jason May 25 '09 at 19:33
#import "Test.h"

@implementation Test 

- (void)setMyNum:(NSNumber *)newNum
{      
    [newNum retain];
    [myNum release]; 
    myNum = newNum;
}

-(NSNumber *)myNum 
{      
    return myNum; 
} 

@end  

Here in the setter method [myNum release] which releases the mynum, but then we are again giving some new value that is newnum, hence from the getter method the temporary number gets the number which has not been deallocated till the [p drain] so there will not be any crash.

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#import "Test.h"

@implementation Test 

(void)setMyNum:(NSNumber *)newNum
{      

[newNum retain];
[myNum release]; 
myNum = newNum;

}

(NSNumber *)myNum 
{      

return myNum; 

} 

@end  

Here is the setter method [myNum release]; Which releases the myNum, but then we are again giving some new value that is newNum, hence from the getter method the temporary number gets the number which has not been deallocated till the [p drain]; so there will not be any crash. Even if the following code will not crash as there is autorelease pool but no autorelease method.

[t setMyNum:[NSNumber numberWithInt:70]];

So releasing the pool will not deallocate the number.

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1  
Don't post something twice; edit your answer if you need to make changes. Please also mark the program samples as such and use standard orthography---i.e., not all caps. –  Michael J. Barber Jul 29 '11 at 7:42

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