Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the (pseudo) code:

public class GlobalClass
{
    public GlobalClass()
    {
        var x = this.GetType().Name // Returns "Channels"
        // WHAT TO DO HERE?
    }
}

public class BaseClass
{
    public string Title { get; set; }
}

And using this code:

public class Channels : GlobalClass
{
    public Channels()
    {

    }

    public class Channel : BaseClass
    {

    }
}

Where the comment is (// WHAT TO DO HERE?), I want to get the runtime type of BaseClass, where in my sample code should return Channel.

I am open to different approaches, but only if it's accompanied with an explanation why I should change the code.

share|improve this question
2  
What are you trying to do, actually? Why do you think you need this type? What if GlobalClass inherits a different class? Which class type will you need in that case? –  Groo Jan 31 '12 at 9:21
    
i have 3-5 class which have the same properties and methods, all i want to do is stop repeating my code in each and every class. i know its a little over my head, but i am willing to learn :) –  Dementic Jan 31 '12 at 9:45
    
why the Close request? there is no duplicate for this question and i found no information googling it. please explain. –  Dementic Jan 31 '12 at 9:46
    
i want to do is stop repeating my code in each and every class: Yes, inheritance will help you achieve this. But there is rarely a need to access the type of the base class when doing this. What do you want to do with this type? –  Groo Jan 31 '12 at 9:53
    
@Groo the data for those classes are loaded from files, which reside each in the appropiate folder name ( the folder name is the same as the class ). –  Dementic Jan 31 '12 at 10:40
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can use reflection like this:

using System.Reflection;

...

public class GlobalClass
{
    public GlobalClass()
    {
        Type[] types = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly ().GetTypes ();
        foreach ( Type t in types )
        {
            if ( t.BaseType == typeof ( BaseClass ) )
            {
                Console.WriteLine ( "I found a class " + t.Name + " that subclass BaseClass" );
            }
        }
    }
}

See also Stack Overflow question List of classes in an assembly.

share|improve this answer
    
this works, but are there any disadvantages i should be aware of? –  Dementic Jan 31 '12 at 9:43
add comment

I think you need a generic class here, something like:

    public class GlobalClass<T> where T : BaseClass
    {
        public GlobalClass()
        {
            var theType = typeof(T);    //you got it
        }
    }
    public class BaseClass
    {
        public string Title { get; set; }
    }

    public class Channel : BaseClass { }
    public class Channels : GlobalClass<Channel> { }
share|improve this answer
add comment

is operator is just for that purpose.

getType() method with class Type can also be used.

class Example 
{
    static void ShowTypeInfo (object o) 
    {  
        Console.WriteLine ("type name = {0}, 
                            full type name = {1}", o.GetType(), 
                            o.GetType().FullName ); 
    }

    public static void Main()
    { 
        long longType = 99; 
        Example example= new Example(); 

        ShowTypeInfo (example); 
        ShowTypeInfo (longType); 
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

To get the runtime type of anything, you first need an object instance to get the type from. So with your given structure, that's not possible.

There are two possible approaches:

  1. Add a BaseClass parameter to the constructor of your GlobalClass:

    public class GlobalClass
    {
        public GlobalClass(BaseClass data)
        {
            var dataType = data == null ? null : data.GetType();
            // do something with the type
        }
    }
    
    public class Channels : GlobalClass
    {
        public Channels(Channel data) : base(data)
        {
    
        }
    
        public class Channel : BaseClass
        {
    
        }
    }
    
  2. Pass the type to the constructor directly:

    public class GlobalClass
    {
        public GlobalClass(Type actualType)
        {
            Debug.Assert(typeof(BaseClass).IsAssignableFrom(actualType));
        }
    }
    
    public class Channels : GlobalClass
    {
        public Channels() : base(typeof(Channel))
        {
    
        }
    
        public class Channel : BaseClass
        {
    
        }
    }
    

If the structure for some reason doesn't allow generics here (as Danny Chen suggested), I'd personally prefer the second approach, since that doesn't need an actual instance.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.