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Please help me to solve this problem:

subset(N, [1,2,3], L).

if N=2, I want the result is that:

[1,2];

[2,1];

[1,3];

[3,1];

[2,3];

[3,2];

(in any order)

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3  
if it's homework please tag as such – CapelliC Jan 31 '12 at 12:36
2  
select/3 it's the builtin that can help you to solve this little problem – CapelliC Jan 31 '12 at 12:39
1  
Please, don't just post your assignment, but show some effort. What have you tried? – Fred Foo Jan 31 '12 at 15:56
    
My solution: <br /> subset(0, , []). <br /> subset(N, [X | T], [X | R]) :- N > 0, N1 is N - 1, subset(N1, T, R). <br /> subset(N, [ | T], R) :- N > 0, subset(N, T, R). <br /> The result is that: <br /> [1,2];[1,3];[2,3]; – Welcome789 Feb 1 '12 at 7:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, your base case is trivial:

subset(0,Lst,[]).

If N>0, you have 2 choices as to what to do with the first element of Lst:

  1. You can ignore it, and look for your subset in what remains of Lst
  2. You can include it in your subset, adding it to what you get for a 1-smaller subset of what remains of Lst.

You might think you have to worry about Lst being too short (or N being too big: same thing), but if you've coded the above properly, it should be taken care of for you.

Hoep that's enough to get you started.

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My solution: <br/> subset(0, , []). <br/> subset(N, [X | T], [X | R]) :- N > 0, N1 is N - 1, subset(N1, T, R). <br/> subset(N, [ | T], R) :- N > 0, subset(N, T, R). <br/> The result is that: <br/> [1,2];[1,3];[2,3]; – Welcome789 Feb 1 '12 at 7:37
    
The result from your solution looks like it has what you originally said you needed, except for the reversed-duplicates. If you still need them, you'll need a rule that produces the reverse of what you produce now. – Scott Hunter Feb 1 '12 at 12:46
    
I tried to reverse my list with SWI-Prolog built-in predicate reverse. But it doesn't work. – Welcome789 Feb 1 '12 at 14:04
    
Not sure what you mean by "doesn't work", but even if it did, it wouldn't solve the problem for N>2. What you need is instead of always taking the first element of the list out, you need to take an arbitrary element out so that all permutations will be possible. – Scott Hunter Feb 1 '12 at 14:24

I rewrite this solution: (based on: Combinations of the elements of a list - Prolog)

subset(N, InList, Out) :-
    splitSet(InList,_,SubList),
    permutation(SubList,Out),
    length(Out, N).

splitSet([ ],[ ],[ ]).
splitSet([H|T],[H|L],R) :-
    splitSet(T,L,R).
splitSet([H|T],L,[H|R]) :-
    splitSet(T,L,R).

The result (tested in SWI-Prolog):

?- subset(2,[1,2,3],R).
R = [2, 3] ;
R = [3, 2] ;
R = [1, 3] ;
R = [3, 1] ;
R = [1, 2] ;
R = [2, 1] ;
false.
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