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I am trying to work out a relatively clean way of comparing two types of DateTime? objects without having to bother with lots of null checking.

Is something like the following a good idea or is there a much simpler or sensible way to go about it;

DateTime? test = DateTime.MinValue;
DateTime? date1 = new DateTime(2008, 6, 1, 7, 47, 0);

if (string.Format("{0:MM/dd/yyyy}", date1) == string.Format("{0:MM/dd/yyyy}", test))
{
    Console.WriteLine("They are the same");
}
else
{
     Console.WriteLine("They are different");
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, using text formatting to compare simple values is not a good idea IMO. One option to make things neater would be to write an extension method to effectively propagate nulls (like a maybe monad):

public static Nullable<TResult> Select<TSource, TResult>
    (this Nullable<TSource> input, Func<TSource, TResult> projection)
    where TSource : struct
    where TResult : struct
{
    return input == null ? (Nullable<TResult>) null : projection(input.Value);
}

You can then compare projections of nullable types easily:

if (date1.Select(x => x.Date).Equals(date2.Select(x => x.Date))

Or even add your own equality projection method:

public static bool EqualsBy<TSource, TResult>
    (this Nullable<TSource> x, Nullable<TSource> y,
     Func<TSource, TResult> projection)
    where TSource : struct
    where TResult : struct
{
    return x.Select(projection).Equals(y.Select(projection));
}

And:

if (date1.EqualsBy(date2, x => x.Date))

This is much more flexible and elegant than performing a text conversion when you really don't care about the text.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree your approach is much more flexible and elegant than my proposal. However, I was mainly looking at a solution that would be quite easy to read and maintainable. I like the idea of the extension method and that it is generic enough that it can be used by Nullable types, however, in my small project it is still likely to only be used in this one instance. Would an extension method (or a projection method) with only one usage be considered over engineering? I'm not meaning to question your approach, I'm just in two minds as to what is best. N.B. I'm not suggesting I'm best :) –  Mr Moose Feb 1 '12 at 3:48
    
@MrMoose: I'm not sure - for just one use I'd probably still extract a method, but do it just for comparing dates. I'd definitely either do that or go with explicit null comparisons - I certainly wouldn't use text formatting. –  Jon Skeet Feb 1 '12 at 6:27
    
Thanks. You've talked me out of my AWESOME solution. For my current situation, I'll probably end up using bvli's example below (modified to suit), but I like your approach. –  Mr Moose Feb 1 '12 at 6:33
    
I actually ended up using your method as it turns out there were more areas where this solution was applicable. The code as is above needs some edits to compile though. I tried to edit but couldn't. The Select extension method needs input cast to TSource and EqualsBy needs to return a bool, remove this from second param and missing comma after param name "y". Thanks for your help. –  Mr Moose Feb 2 '12 at 6:55
    
@MrMoose: Fixed, thanks. Rather than a cast in Select, I've just used the Value property. –  Jon Skeet Feb 2 '12 at 7:01

What's wrong with:

bool result = test == date1;

Edit: Sorry - didn't noticed you just wanted the date part.

bool result;
if (one.HasValue && two.HasValue) {
  result = one.Value.Date == two.Value.Date;
} else {
    result = one == two;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like this. I didn't realise that Nullable types allowed you to access their properties if they were in fact null. I was expecting a null reference error. Having said that, I like the fact that my example has only one conditional to derive a result. Even so, it would appear that my solution isn't really considered a great way to go about things. –  Mr Moose Feb 1 '12 at 3:31
    
Thanks for your solution, I ended up using Jon's after all as it turns out there were more areas in the code where it would be applicable. –  Mr Moose Feb 2 '12 at 6:56

Method1: to compare two dates values (after checking if it already have values)

if (test.HasValue && date1.HasValue 
    && test.Value.Date == date1.Value.Date)
{
// your code
}

Method2: to compare two dates using DateTime CompareTo function (after checking if it already have values)

if (test.HasValue && date1.HasValue 
    && date1.Value.Date.CompareTo(test.Value.Date) == 0)
{
// your code
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Note that these will return false if both test and date1 are null, which I don't believe is the intention. –  Jon Skeet Jan 31 '12 at 9:47

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