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I'm using a named mutex to lock acces to a file (with path 'strFilePath') in a construction like this:

private void DoSomethingsWithAFile(string strFilePath)
{
      Mutex mutex = new Mutex(false,strFilePath.Replace("\\",""));
      try
      {
         mutex.WaitOne();
         //do something with the file....
      }
      catch(Exception ex)
      {
         //handle exception
      }
      finally
      {
         mutex.ReleaseMutex();
      }
 }

So, this way the code will only block the thread when the same file is being processed already. Well, I tested this and seemed to work ok, but I really would like to know your thoughts about this.

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1  
are you trying to implement a classic producer-consumer-scenario? give us more information on your scenario - it's very hard to work/help with that trimmed view on your actual problem! –  Andreas Niedermair Jan 31 '12 at 10:02
1  
any other software like Windows Explorer, Notepad etc. does NOT know anything about your "mutex-based lock" and will happily ignore it! –  Yahia Jan 31 '12 at 10:03
    
@Yahia Yes, I know, but that is not the idea. I use this construct for thread synchronization within my program. If I don not want other programs to acces the file, I'll just use the ordinary filelocking mechanisms. –  Jurgen Jan 31 '12 at 10:08
    
@Andreas Well, I have different threads in my code that will write/remove data to/from a file, which I synchronize like this. –  Jurgen Jan 31 '12 at 10:10
1  
@Jurgen you need to provide much more information then... you just need a mechanism to "lock" tiles inside your multi-threaded process ? what .NET version are you using ? –  Yahia Jan 31 '12 at 10:11

3 Answers 3

Since you are talking about a producer-consumer situation with multiple threads the "standard solution would be to use BlockingCollection which is part of .NET 4 and up - several links with information:

IF you just want to make the locking process work then:

use a ConcurrentDictionary in combination with the TryAdd method call... if it returns true then the file was not "locked" and is now "locked" so the thread can proceed - and "unlock" it by calling Remove at the end... any other thread gets false in the meantime and can decide what to do...

I would definitely recommend the BlockingCollection approach though!

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dah ... bet me by 4 secs ... :) –  Andreas Niedermair Jan 31 '12 at 10:22
    
Ah, thank you. I will look into that! –  Jurgen Jan 31 '12 at 10:24

an alternative would be: make one consumer thread which works on a queue, and blocks if it is empty. you can have several producer threads adding several filepaths to this queue and inform the consumer.

since .net 4.0 there's a nice new class: System.Collections.Concurrent.BlockingCollection<T>

a while ago i had the same issue here on so

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I run in same problem with many threads that can write in the same file.

The one of the reason that mutex not good because it slowly:

duration of call mutexSyncTest: 00:00:08.9795826    
duration of call NamedLockTest: 00:00:00.2565797

BlockingCollection collection - very good idea, but for my case with rare collisions, parallel writes beter than serial writes. Also way with dictionary much more easy to realise.

I use this solution (UPDATED):

public class NamedLock
{
    private class LockAndRefCounter
    {
        public long refCount;
    }

    private ConcurrentDictionary<string, LockAndRefCounter> locksDictionary = new ConcurrentDictionary<string, LockAndRefCounter>();

    public void DoWithLockBy(string key, Action actionWithLock)
    {
        var lockObject = new LockAndRefCounter();

        var keyLock = locksDictionary.GetOrAdd(key, lockObject);
        Interlocked.Increment(ref keyLock.refCount);

        lock (keyLock)
        {
            actionWithLock();

            Interlocked.Decrement(ref keyLock.refCount);
            if (Interlocked.Read(ref keyLock.refCount) <= 0)
            {
                LockAndRefCounter removed;
                locksDictionary.TryRemove(key, out removed);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
I think there is a problem with removing the entry from the dictionary. What if three clients call the method: the first creates the key and acquires the lock, the second gets the existing key and waits for the lock, the first finishes and removes the key and releases the lock, the second can start, a third comes in and creates a new key and acquires a new lock before the second has finished. Second and third are now running simultaneously. –  Rupert Rawnsley Sep 23 '13 at 8:46
    
Rupert Rawnsley, you are absolutely right. Thank you. –  gabba Sep 23 '13 at 14:54

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