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I have a case where I want to validate an entered vat number. Each European country has a pre-defined format and I can create a regex pattern to validate an entered number.

My question is what would be the most "pythonic" way to handle this for 20 countries. Should I create a dictionary with each of the country and its pattern

Example

VAT_PATTERNS = {
   'ES': '([A-Z0-9][0-9]{7}[A-Z0-9]$)',
   'DE': '([0-9]{9}$)',
}

or is there a more pythonic way?

There are cases where several countries have the same pattern. Some countries might also have more complex patterns.

I could create a VAT base class from where each country's class inherits and handle it that way but that seems a bit out of place.

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To clarify: a VAT is a 'value-added tax', a kind of sales tax (not seen, or at least called thus, in Canada or the US for example). The number is a registration number for businesses used when they submit collected tax to the government. –  Karl Knechtel Jan 31 '12 at 13:52
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Part of the "Zen of Python" (type import this into an interpreter!) is that "Explicit is better than implicit" and "Simple is better than complex".

What you've described looks both simple and explicit, and so I would consider it pretty pythonic.

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(I'm not sure there is a real answer to questions like this one -- what's "pythonic" and what is not is still much influenced by personal taste, IMHO. But since you ask for it, here's my take.)

The Zen of Python says:

Explicit is better than implicit. Simple is better than complex.

So, in your case, I'd say that a mapping country to VAT pattern, as you propose, is the simplest and most explicit solution, and therefore the most "pythonic" one.

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The "If the implementation is easy to explain, it may be a good idea." part is also relevant! –  dbr Jan 31 '12 at 11:05
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The only place for improvement could be storing the shared patterns in variables named with a descriptive name (like for example VAT_PATTERN_WESTERN_EUROPE) and then use it in the map values.

But as this is unlikely to ever change, and if it does it will probably not change in all the countries at the same time, it seems a better option to just leave it as a constant expression in the values.

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I think your solution is great; simple and explicit. You could reduce duplication by doing something like this, assuming Spain, Italy, and the UK all use the same VAT (sorry, I'm Canadian; not factually accurate):

VAT_PATTERNS = {
   'ES': '([A-Z0-9][0-9]{7}[A-Z0-9]$)',
   'DE': '([0-9]{9}$)',
}
VAT_PATTERNS['IT'] = VAT_PATTERNS['UK'] = VAT_PATTERNS['ES']

Or even shorter:

VAT_PATTERNS = {
   'ES': '([A-Z0-9][0-9]{7}[A-Z0-9]$)',
   'DE': '([0-9]{9}$)',
}
V = VAT_PATTERNS # I like to use a short alias for speed
V['IT'] = V['UK'] = V['ES']
del V
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