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I need to use the uasort() function, but I don't get how to get the arguments in the function... The given example is not so clear for me. How does the cmp function gets his arguments? Someone care to explain?

<?php
// Comparison function
function cmp($a, $b) {
    if ($a == $b) {
        return 0;
    }
    return ($a < $b) ? -1 : 1;
}

// Array to be sorted
$array = array('a' => 4, 'b' => 8, 'c' => -1, 'd' => -9, 'e' => 2, 'f' => 5, 'g' => 3, 'h' => -4);
print_r($array);

// Sort and print the resulting array
uasort($array, 'cmp');
print_r($array);
?>
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The order in which elements are picked from the array shouldn't make any difference to the way in which your comparison function works.

uasort will be applied until every element in your array is sorted based upon the comparison you apply to it in your cmp function.

Updated

If you really want to know how it's sorted, looking at the PHP source, the array first has zend_hash_sort applied to it which uses the zend_qsort comparison function which as far as I'm aware, just orders by value.

Try changing your cmp function to the below to see what's going on:

function cmp($a, $b) {
    echo "a=$a, b=$b"; // add this to see what's going on
    if ($a == $b) {
        return 0;
    }
    return ($a < $b) ? -1 : 1;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer! But how does the function cmp($a, $b) get his arguments ($a and $b)? –  Michiel Jan 31 '12 at 11:55
    
PHP picks two elements from the array you pass to the uasort function to compare, you don't need to pass anything specifically. –  Paul Bain Feb 1 '12 at 10:56
    
But in this case, there are more then 2 items in the array... So how does PHP know which elements to take? –  Michiel Feb 1 '12 at 10:58
1  
PHP iterates over the array, comparing the items many times to get them into the correct order. i.e. in the array {2,3,5,4} it would probably compare $a=2 and $b=3, then $a=3 and $b=5, then $a=5 and $b=4. –  Paul Bain Feb 1 '12 at 11:01
1  
Presumably it's using the Quicksort algorithm ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quicksort ) to do its work. So the cmp function will be called a number of times according to the Quicksort algorithm, each time being called with 2 entries from the array which the algorithm is trying to determine in which order they come. –  mattjgalloway Feb 9 '12 at 0:26

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