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I have a small problem with an SQL query. Maybe I just couldn't wake up yet, having my 2nd coffee but still seems like my brain can't work or figure out yet and it is already making my day (morning) really bad.

What I want to do is to count records from 2 tables with duplicates as 1 record. Lets say; 1. members table 2. subscriptions table.

I would like to find how many members has an active subscription.

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM members as main 
INNER JOIN subscriptions as sub ON sub.member_id = main.id 
WHERE 
sub.status = '2' AND sub.active = '1' 
GROUP BY main.id

Obviously that's not it. A member could have more than 1 active subscription so I would like to count that member as 1 subscriber (no matter how many active subscription a member has).

I'm planing to create a new table to members subscriptions but that's just going to have a table which I might not really need at this point.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should do the trick:

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT main.id) FROM members as main 
INNER JOIN subscriptions as sub ON sub.member_id = main.id 
WHERE sub.status = '2' AND sub.active = '1' 
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, I wrote on the tags distinct I have no idea why I didn't try that one out. Once again thank you. –  Revenant Jan 31 '12 at 10:50

The most direct way to build your query is by adding a correlated subquery: your SQL reads almost like English:

SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM members as main 
where exists (
    select 1 from subscriptions as sub
    where sub.member_id = main.id  and sub.status = '2' AND sub.active = '1'
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot for your help and time dasblinkenlight. I accepted the other answer cos it looks much simple and cleaner. –  Revenant Jan 31 '12 at 10:51

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