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I just hope the following doesn't seem to you like redundant jabber :)
Anyway, there is that:

for (p = fmt; *p; p++) {
    if (*p != '%') {
        putchar(*p);
        continue;
    }
    switch (*++p) {
        /* Some cases here */
        ...
    }
 }

And I wondered why the writer (Kernighan / Ritchie) used the continue in the if statement.
I thought it was for the mere reason that he deemed it would be more elegant than indenting the whole switch under an else statement, what do you think?

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11 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Probably. The human brain has limited stack space, making it difficult to deal with deeply nested structures. Anything that flattens the information we're expected to parse makes it easier to understand.

Similarly, I normally prefer this:

bool foo(int arg)
{
    if(!arg) {
        /* arg can't be 0 */
        return false; 
    }

    /* Do some work */
    return true;
 }

To this:

 bool foo(int arg) 
 { 
     if(!arg) {
         /* arg can't be 0 */ 
         return false; 
     } else {
         /* Do some work */ 
         return true;
     } 
 }

Or worse, to this:

bool foo(int arg) 
{ 
    if(arg) {
        /* Do some work */ 
        return true;
    } else {
        /* arg can't be 0 */ 
        return false; 
    } 
}

In the last example, the part that does the work might be quite long. By the time the reader gets to the else clause, he may not remember how he got there.

Putting the bail out conditions as close to the beginning helps to assure that people who try to call your functions will have a good idea of what inputs the function expects.

Also, as others pointed out, the continue makes it clear that there's no need to read further into the code inside the loop to determine whether any more processing is done after that point for this case, making the code easier to follow. Again, the fewer things you force the reader to keep track of, the better.

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Because with the continue it is clear that the code is done for this loop iteration. If a else would have been used you had also to check if there is no code after the else.

I think it is general a good habit to exit a context as soon as possible because this leads to much clearer code.


For example:

if(arg1 == NULL)
  return;

if(arg2 == NULL)
  return;

//Do some stuff

vs.

if(arg1 != null)
{
  if(arg2 != null)
  {
    //Do some stuff
  }
}
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1  
+1 Clear code. In addition to this, when the code is later modified you don't have to think about all the error cases because they've been dealt with at the top, you know that you only have to deal with the valid cases. I feel that it is very elegant to write code this way - had experience with the 'other' version as well as it was a standard in my other company - e.g. only one return stuff ... –  stefanB May 26 '09 at 1:00
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It is just so much easier to read when it's put like this.

Are we done here with this iteration through the loop? Yes? So let us continue with the next iteration.

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1  
That's arguable - it depends on whether this idiom is common in your code. If it's not it has the disadvantage of being a slightly unusual way of controlling a loop, and a potential maintenance problem / bug source. –  therefromhere May 25 '09 at 20:22
    
yes, that's quite correct. People not used to this idiom may be confused when faced with maintaining it. It's just what I am used to and what heuristics taught me is better. It's easier for me to get lost in nested if-then-else blocks then to notice a break; or continue; –  Peter Perháč May 25 '09 at 23:03
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There are always many ways to write code like this -

Putting the entire switch inside an else statement would be perfectly valid. I suppose the reason they did it this way ~may~ have been just the way they were thinking at the time:

"if the value at p does not equal '%', put then continue on."

If you have switch under an else, it may not have been as obvious to the writer that you were jumping to the next iteration in that specific case.

This is completely personal style choices, though. I wouldn't worry too much - just write it in a way that makes the most sense to you and your team.

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I agree. But you can't look at it as a "mere reason", it's actually a pretty good reason, because it reduces the over all complexity of the code. Making it shorter and easier to read and understand.

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If you use an else then everything inside the else needs to be indented:

if ()
{
  doA();
}
else
{
  doB();
  if ()
  {
    doC();
  }
  else
  {
    doD()
  }
}

If you use continue then you don't need to indent:

if ()
{
  doA()
  continue;
}
doB();
if ()
{
  doC();
  continue;
}
doD();

Also, continue means that I can stop thinking about that case: for example, if I see else then perhaps there'll be more processing of the '%' case later in the loop, i.e. at the end of the else statement; whereas on seeing continue I know instantly that the processing of the '%' case in the loop is completely finished.

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The most probable reason is that the switch that follows is rather long - this looks like printf format parsing.

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I think that he would have reasons enough to indent the code under the switch, and indenting the entire meat of the function is quite wasteful of horizontal space. At the time the code was written, I imagine 80 character widths were still popular.

I don't think it is difficult to understand, but I do think that it's quite nice to mention what you DON'T do immediately, and then GTFO.

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There could be more that one reason to continue/break a loop. So it would look next:

loop
{
   if (cond1)
   {
      if (cond2)
      {
         if (cond2)
         {
            more conditions...
         }
      }
   }
   else
   {
      the loop action 
   }
}

IMHO it's not so elegant and readable as the loop in your example, e.g:

loop
{
   if (cond1)
      continue;
   if (cond2)
      continue;
   if (cond2)
      continue;   
   if( more conditions...)
      continue;

  the loop action 
}

And you don't even need to understand all structure of all "if"s (it could be much more complex) to understand the loop logic.

P.S. just for the case: I don't think the authors thought about how to write this loop, they just wrote it:)

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I stick to Dijkstra's teachings: goto is harmful. And continue/break are goto's little brothers.

If the problem is that you're indenting the code too much, the solution is not putting a continue in the loop, but reducing the complexity by separating the code in different functions or thinking about a better way of organizing it.

For example, @Kamarey snippet would be even clearer like this:

loop
{
   if (!(cond1 ||
         cond2 ||
         cond2 || 
         ...))
   {
      the loop actions;
   }
}

or @Ori Pessach example could be expressed like:

bool foo(int arg)
{
    if(arg) {
        /*do some work*/
    }

    return arg != 0;
}

In brief, usually I can't find a good enough reason to use non structured programming constructs (maybe for some cleanup codes in a very limited ocasions...)

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I respect what you say. I know Dijkstra expressed his objection to using GOTO but did he say anything about continue / break? I find that these statements simplify code. –  Leif Ericson May 25 '09 at 21:10
    
As I understand it, E.D. objected to arbitrary GOTOs. continue/break are fairly constrained in what their targets can be; GOTO on the other hand can potentially go anywhere. –  mlp May 26 '09 at 1:12
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Well, I wrote C programs for about 11 years and I had to read 5 times your piece of code to understand it !

Kernighan and Ritchie were active in the sixties. At that time, being able to understand a piece of code was not relevant. Being able to write code that fit in 16 Ko was.

So I'm not suprised. C is a terrible language when your teatchers are K & R. Just look at realloc : who would know code something like that today ? In the '60ies, it was all the rage, but it is now appalling, at least :o)

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2  
K&R came out in 1978, not the 1960s, and is generally considered a very good piece of writing, concise and well-written. Clarity of code was highly relevant: at the 1968 NATO Software Engineering Conference a decade earlier, the participants agreed that software was becoming so complex that there was a 'software crisis'. The code sample being discussed uses very common C (and C++) idioms. –  Jim Ferrans May 25 '09 at 21:04
    
Well, just look at realloc. A real piece of crap by today standards. If you like K and R, cool, you are just 2 decades behind ! All the best ! –  SRO May 25 '09 at 21:33
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