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This is my first time experimenting on collision algorithm. I tried checking the rect size of an object with the boundary. Now, in this application, I made running bullets and check if the collision in a no time-delay while loop. The problem is, as I spawn around 30-40 bullets, the fps gets so low. I would be glad if someone could teach me a robust way to write collision detection.

By the way, I used a java Vector collection (Maybe the iteration is not fast enough? or my code is being too messy)

public void checkBoundary(int width, int height) //width and height of the applet
{
    for(int i = 0; i < vec.size(); i++)
    {
        if(vec.get(i).x + vec.get(i).width <= 0 ||
            vec.get(i).y + vec.get(i).height <= 0 ||
            vec.get(i).x >= width ||
            vec.get(i).y >= height)
            vec.remove(i);
    }
}

This Vector store an object of Bullet with (x,y) as bottom-left corner, and (width,height).

share|improve this question
    
For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. – Andrew Thompson Jan 31 '12 at 12:27

First your algorithm is incorrect because when you remove using vec.remove(i);, the i+1 element become the i element, so you skip one element.

The performance issue come from the fact that on worst case each remove cost O(n), as each subsequent element need to be shifted left. try this:

public void checkBoundary(int width, int height) //width and height of the applet
{
  LinkedList<T> outofbounds = new LinkedList<T>();
  for(int i = 0; i < vec.size(); i++)
  {
    if(vec.get(i).x + vec.get(i).width <= 0 ||
        vec.get(i).y + vec.get(i).height <= 0 ||
        vec.get(i).x >= width ||
        vec.get(i).y >= height)
        outofbounds.add(vec.at(i)); 
  }
  vec.removeAll(outofbounds);

}

Edit:

As Frozen Spider pointed out, removeAll is expensive. It has a complexity of O(outofbounds.size()*vec.size()), which is O(n^2). When slightly changing the logic you can derive an algorithm which is guaranteed to work in O(vec.size()).

public void checkBoundary(int width, int height) //width and height of the applet
{
  LinkedList<T> newvec = new LinkedList<T>(); 
  for(int i = 0; i < vec.size(); i++)
  {
    if(vec.get(i).x + vec.get(i).width <= 0 ||
        vec.get(i).y + vec.get(i).height <= 0 ||
        vec.get(i).x >= width ||
        vec.get(i).y >= height)
        continue;

        newvec.add(vec.at(i)); 
  }
  vec.clear();
  // or vec = newvec if there are no others reference sharing the same object as vec
  vec.addAll(newvec); 

}
share|improve this answer
1  
removeAll() is an expensive operation: function takes 25 seconds to process 100k elements. – Frozen Spider Feb 1 '12 at 4:18
    
you are correct, cost is O(mn). – UmNyobe Feb 1 '12 at 8:41

remove() is a very costly operation, much faster will be to create new list, copy desired elements into it and replace original list with new one.

I also recommend you to use ArrayList instead of Vector. If you need synchronization, wrap ArrayList in Collections.synchronizedList().

Try this, works almost instantly - <16 ms (0.016 sec) over 100k elements:

public static void checkBoundary(int width, int height) // width and height of the applet
{
    int size = vec.size();
    List <YourObjectType> newVec = new ArrayList <YourObjectType>(size);
    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        YourObjectType element = vec.get(i);
        if (element.x + element.width > 0 && 
            element.y + element.height > 0 &&
            element.x < width && 
            element.y < height) {
                newVec.add(element);
        }
    }
    vec = newVec;
}
share|improve this answer
    
one of my major confusion in java collection is how does ArrayList different from Vector? By the way, I personally haven't yet understand the term "synchronized", so can you please help me clarify synchronization in java? I thought it is for Thread methods only... – user385261 Jan 31 '12 at 12:24
    
"synchronized" method is a method that can be executed by only one thread in any one time simultaneously. Same with the synchronized classes, except for all it's method are synchronized as one. This is useful to prevent some undefined behaviour known as a race condition. However, synchronization implies cost: every call to a synchronized method takes longer compared to regular method call. So, if you dont plan to use the same instance among multiple threads, try to avoid using synchronization. – Frozen Spider Jan 31 '12 at 12:35

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