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Given following Table

select rv, mv, datetime, rawv from mytable where datetime > '2012-01-30';
+------+------+---------------------+------+
| rv   | mv   | datetime            | rawv |
+------+------+---------------------+------+
|    5 |   81 | 2012-01-31 07:00:00 |    1 |
|    5 |   81 | 2012-01-31 07:01:00 |    2 |
|    5 |   82 | 2012-01-31 07:00:00 |    3 |
|    5 |   82 | 2012-01-31 07:01:00 |    4 |
|    5 |   83 | 2012-01-31 08:00:00 |    5 |
|    5 |   83 | 2012-01-31 08:01:00 |    6 |
+------+------+---------------------+------+

I'm looking for a SQL-statement which provides the records with the maximal datetime value for each rv, mv group. The result should look like:

+------+------+---------------------+------+
| rv   | mv   | max(datetime)       | rawv |
+------+------+---------------------+------+
|    5 |   81 | 2012-01-31 07:01:00 |    2 |
|    5 |   82 | 2012-01-31 07:01:00 |    4 |
|    5 |   83 | 2012-01-31 08:01:00 |    6 |
+------+------+---------------------+------+

Do you know such a statement?

What I've tried so far is following, but as you can see I'm getting wrong results:

select rv, mv, max(datetime), rawv from mytable
where mv in (81,82,83)
group by rv, mv;
+------+------+---------------------+------+
| rv   | mv   | max(datetime)       | rawv |
+------+------+---------------------+------+
|    5 |   81 | 2012-01-31 07:01:00 |    0 |
|    5 |   82 | 2012-01-31 07:01:00 |    0 |
|    5 |   83 | 2012-01-31 08:01:00 |    5 |
+------+------+---------------------+------+
3 rows in set (0.72 sec)

and

select rv, mv, datetime, rawv from mytable
where mp_nb in (81,82,83)
and datetime=(select max(datetime) from met_value);

+------+------+---------------------+------+
| rv   | mv   | datetime            | rawv |
+------+------+---------------------+------+
|    5 |   83 | 2012-01-31 08:01:00 |    6 |
+------+------+---------------------+------+
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this query -

SELECT t1.rv, t1.mv, t1.datetime, t1.rawv FROM mytable t1
  JOIN (SELECT rv, mv, MAX(datetime) datetime FROM mytable GROUP BY rv, mv) t2
    ON t1.rv = t2.rv AND t1.mv = t2.mv AND t1.datetime = t2.datetime
share|improve this answer
    
+1: Your statement provides the desired result. Thanks! –  Christian Ammer Jan 31 '12 at 13:23

This a pretty common question, and you'll find similar questions/answers under the "max-n-per-group" tag on Stack Overflow.

The usual way to do this is to join mytable to itself with a LEFT JOIN:

SELECT a.rv, a.mv, a.datetime, a.rawv
FROM mytable a
LEFT JOIN mytable b
 ON a.rv=b.rv AND a.mv=b.mv
 AND a.datetime < b.datetime
WHERE a.mv IN (81,82,83)
AND b.datetime IS NULL;

The general form of this query is:

SELECT a.[colnames I want]
FROM mytable a
LEFT JOIN mytable b
 ON a.[colnames to GROUP BY] = b.[colnames to GROUP BY]
 AND a.[colname I want MAX of] < b.[colname I want MAX of]
WHERE b.[colname I want MAX of] IS NULL
[and any other where conditions]

It basically joins the table to itself on your mv and rv columns, and makes pairs of datetimes within each mv,rv group such that a's is less than b.

If there's a row in a such that there is no greater value in b (ie b.datetime IS NULL), then you have precisely the max for that group.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmm I've tried your statement but it doesn't complete (even after minutes). Anyway, +1 for the search hint. –  Christian Ammer Jan 31 '12 at 13:37

You can't mix aggregate and non-aggregate columns like that.

From your dataset I noticed that rawv also increases with time. If that's true, you can also MAX it.

select rv, mv, max(datetime), max(rawv)
from mytable
where mv in (81,82,83)
group by rv, mv;
share|improve this answer
    
There's unfortunately no guarantee for the increasing –  Christian Ammer Jan 31 '12 at 12:52
    
@ChristianAmmer: use other answers then, they are more correct :-) –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 31 '12 at 12:53

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