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How can I represent integer as Binary?

so I can print 7 as 111

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Have a look here (I guess no inbuilt function?) –  mathematical.coffee Jan 31 '12 at 13:04
    
it is out of date a little :) –  fl00r Jan 31 '12 at 13:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You write a function to do this.

num=7
function toBits(num)
    -- returns a table of bits, least significant first.
    local t={} -- will contain the bits
    while num>0 do
        rest=math.fmod(num,2)
        t[#t+1]=rest
        num=(num-rest)/2
    end
    return t
end
bits=toBits(num)
print(table.concat(bits))

In Lua 5.2 you've already have bitwise functions which can help you ( bit32 )


Here is the most-significant-first version, with optional leading 0 padding to a specified number of bits:

function toBits(num,bits)
    -- returns a table of bits, most significant first.
    bits = bits or select(2,math.frexp(num))
    local t={} -- will contain the bits        
    for b=bits,1,-1 do
        t[b]=math.fmod(num,2)
        num=(num-t[b])/2
    return t
end
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1  
you have got reversed bits in your function, so 20 will return 00101, not 10100 –  fl00r Jan 31 '12 at 13:56
    
you did not state whether you wanted big or little endian. The example didn't give it away either, since 111 is a palindrome ;). Anyway, adapting it is easy: just use nBits=ceiling(select(2,math.frexp(num))) and use a for-loop starting at nBits going to 1. –  jpjacobs Jan 31 '12 at 13:59
    
my fault, sorry, nevertheless the answer is right and useful, thank you! –  fl00r Jan 31 '12 at 14:00
    
I've added a most-significant version to your answer. I left off the call to math.ceil() because, as far as I can tell, frexp always returns an integer for the second value. Is there an edge case that I have missed? –  Phrogz Sep 26 '14 at 3:45
    
No indeed, as per the manual on math.frexp, the second return value should be always integer. Thanks for the edit! –  jpjacobs Sep 29 '14 at 9:52
function bits(num)
    local t={}
    while num>0 do
        rest=num%2
        table.insert(t,1,rest)
        num=(num-rest)/2
    end return table.concat(t)
end

Since nobody wants to use table.insert while it's useful here

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Actually, using table.insert increases the complexity of the algorithm from O(n) to O(n^2). Doing what jpjacobs said in his comment, first determine the length of the number and then fill the array backwards, is much more efficient. Especially for large numbers. The only changes would be to replace while num>0 do by for i=math.ceil(select(2,math.frexp(num))),1,-1 do and t[#t+1] by t[i]. –  RPFeltz Aug 23 '14 at 12:22

Here is a function inspired by the accepted answer with a correct syntax which returns a table of bits in wriiten from right to left.

num=255
bits=8
function toBits(num, bits)
    -- returns a table of bits
    local t={} -- will contain the bits
    for b=bits,1,-1 do
        rest=math.fmod(num,2)
        t[b]=rest
        num=(num-rest)/2
    end
    if num==0 then return t else return {'Not enough bits to represent this number'}end
end
bits=toBits(num, bits)
print(table.concat(bits))

>>11111111
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function reverse(t)
  local nt = {} -- new table
  local size = #t + 1
  for k,v in ipairs(t) do
    nt[size - k] = v
  end
  return nt
end

function tobits(num)
    local t={}
    while num>0 do
        rest=num%2
        t[#t+1]=rest
        num=(num-rest)/2
    end
    t = reverse(t)
    return table.concat(t)
end
print(tobits(7))
# 111
print(tobits(33))
# 100001
print(tobits(20))
# 10100
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