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void __fastcall TForm1::Button1Click(TObject *Sender)
{
    int size =  MemoEnter->GetTextLen() + 1;
    wchar_t *szBuff = new wchar_t[size];
    memset(szBuff, 0, sizeof(szBuff));
    MemoEnter->GetTextBuf((wchar_t *)szBuff, size);
    TcpClient->SendBuf(szBuff, sizeof(szBuff));
    LogOut->Lines->Add(szBuff);
    delete []szBuff;
}  

Why doesn't TcpClient send anything? Server is ok. connection is ok. Telnet sends data to the server but this code does not.

Guys! i tried to

TcpClient->SendBuf("fsd", 3);

and still got nothing

share|improve this question
    
Did the TcpClient connect OK? No errors/exceptions? –  Martin James Jan 31 '12 at 13:22
    
Yep. that part is ok –  user1174133 Feb 1 '12 at 5:54

2 Answers 2

This may be contributing to the problem:

sizeof(szBuff); // Returns the sizeof a wchar_t*,
                // not the number of characters in szBuff

Change:

memset(szBuff, 0, sizeof(szBuff));
...
TcpClient->SendBuf(szBuff, sizeof(szBuff));

To:

memset(szBuff, 0, sizeof(wchar_t) * size);
...
TcpClient->SendBuf(szBuff, wcslen(szBuff));

If the second argument of TcpClient->SendBuf() is the number of bytes, not characters, then change to:

TcpClient->SendBuf(szBuff, wcslen(szBuff) * sizeof(wchar_t));
share|improve this answer
    
Nope. The problem is in the TcpClient component. memset works fine. –  user1174133 Feb 1 '12 at 5:25
    
TcpClient just dont send anything –  user1174133 Feb 1 '12 at 5:25

Your use of sizeof() is definately the problem. You are sending your data specifying the size of the pointer that points at the buffer, not the size of the buffer itself. The size of a pointer is 4 in 32-bit and 8 in 64-bit. You need to use the actual buffer size instead of the pointer size.

Rather than using the new[] operator, you should use the VCL's String class instead, eg:

void __fastcall TForm1::Button1Click(TObject *Sender) 
{ 
    String s = MemoEnter->Text; 
    TcpClient->SendBuf(s.c_str(), ByteLength(s)); 
    LogOut->Lines->Add(s); 
}

Note that String is an alias for UnicodeString. If the receiver is not expecting UTF-16 encoded data, then you need to convert the data to another encoding before you send it, eg:

void __fastcall TForm1::Button1Click(TObject *Sender) 
{ 
    String s = MemoEnter->Text; 
    UTF8String utf8 = s;
    TcpClient->SendBuf(utf8.c_str(), utf8.Length()); 
    LogOut->Lines->Add(s); 
}

Or:

void __fastcall TForm1::Button1Click(TObject *Sender) 
{ 
    String s = MemoEnter->Text; 
    AnsiString ansi = s; // <-- potential data loss for non-ASCII characters!
    TcpClient->SendBuf(ansi.c_str(), ansi.Length()); 
    LogOut->Lines->Add(s); 
}

Or:

void __fastcall TForm1::Button1Click(TObject *Sender) 
{ 
    String s = MemoEnter->Text; 
    AnsiStringT<SomeCodePage> ansi = s; // <-- use a suitable codepage to avoid data loss!
    TcpClient->SendBuf(ansi.c_str(), ansi.Length()); 
    LogOut->Lines->Add(s); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for interesting information, but still, it didnt send anything. i mean id doesnt send a bit of a data.just nothing. –  user1174133 Feb 1 '12 at 5:49
    
What is the actual return value of SendBuf()? It returns the number of bytes accepted into the socket's outbound buffer, or -1 on error. –  Remy Lebeau Feb 1 '12 at 6:29
    
It prints number 22. At docwiki.embarcadero.com/VCL/en/… it says return value is bytes sent –  user1174133 Feb 1 '12 at 6:38
    
That documentation is for TCustomWinSocket, not TTcpClient. But in any case, the return value of SendBuf() in either component is the number of bytes that were successfully put into the socket's internal send buffer, not how many bytes were sent over the network. The OS handles the actual transmission in the background. The app has no way of knowing when the actual transmission occurs. If SendBuf() returns 22, then the socket really accepted 22 bytes, and it is out of your hands. Now you need to double-check that the code on the receiving end is working properly. –  Remy Lebeau Feb 1 '12 at 11:19
    
Use a packet sniffer, such as Wireshark, to validate and see when the OS transmits the data over the network, and when it arrives on the other end. –  Remy Lebeau Feb 1 '12 at 11:19

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