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I have a dictionary of the form:

d = { 'someText': floatNumber }

Where floatNumber is an epoch timestamp. I'm trying to organise this such that time is in ascending order.

Example: {'someText':0000001, 'someText1':0000002, and so on}

Only way I can think of doing it is by looping with for k,v in dict.items() and then manually sorting it into a list but that may take a long time. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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What do you mean by ['someText':0000001, ...]? What is that supposed to be, a list? –  user647772 Jan 31 '12 at 14:03
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Don't use the reserved word dict as a variable. –  user647772 Jan 31 '12 at 14:04
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Look at: docs.python.org/tutorial/datastructures.html#dictionaries and you'll see: tel['irv'] = 4127 -> tel -> {'guido': 4127, 'irv': 4127, 'jack': 4098} -> My format. –  Federer Jan 31 '12 at 14:16
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Well since it was a question and that format was an example of output, then it could have been a dictionary or a list or anything you wanted. Nonetheless it's edited, for you. –  Federer Jan 31 '12 at 14:21
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Thanks, I appreciate that :) –  user647772 Jan 31 '12 at 14:22
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Maybe you want:

import operator
values = sorted(d.items(), key=operator.itemgetter(1))

which would generate a sorted list of tuples, like

[('someText', 1), ('someText', 2), ...]

Dictionaries cannot be sorted, so you have to use another data structure to store your key-value pairs.

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Did the job perfectly. May I ask why 1 is passed into itemgetter()? –  Federer Jan 31 '12 at 14:35
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@malcmcmul: Every element of d.items() is a tuple, containing the key as first and the value as second element. Indexes of lists and tuples are 0-based. Hence the index of the value in the tuple (by which you want to sort) is 1. –  Felix Kling Jan 31 '12 at 14:37
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An order dictionary can be used to store the entries in sorted order:

>>> from collections import OrderedDict
>>> d = OrderedDict(sorted(dict.items(), key=lambda item: item[1]))
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from operator import itemgetter

d = {'foo':1, 'bar':3, 'baz':2}
l = [(k, v) for k, v in d.items()]
s = sorted(l, key=itemgetter(1))

# s == [('foo', 1), ('baz', 2), ('bar', 3)]

More on sorting: http://wiki.python.org/moin/HowTo/Sorting

Edit:

Improved version (thanks for the comment):

from operator import itemgetter

d = {'foo':1, 'bar':3, 'baz':2}
s = sorted(d.items(), key=itemgetter(1))

# s == [('foo', 1), ('baz', 2), ('bar', 3)]
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.items() already returns a list of tuples. –  Felix Kling Jan 31 '12 at 14:07
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First, by default dictionaries are unsorted. You may want to use a list and insert into the appropriate location as you build the dataset. Otherwise, use the sorted function.

sorted(dict.iteritems(), key=lambda (x, y): y)
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