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I'm having difficulty with an SQL query against Server 2008 from IIS7. I have a VB.NET class library which runs an update statement. The underlying code used to create the connection hasn't changed, but suddenly the query is failing in our testing and development environments. It does, however, still work against the same server/database using the slightly older code in our production environment.

I've tried setting the connection timeout in the web.config and I'm at a loss to explain the cause.

The basic structure of the query is:

Dim conn = New SqlConnection()
conn.ConnectionString = "Data Source=someserver\sqlexpress2008;Initial Catalog=DatabaseName;User ID=sa;Password=pass"
conn.Open()
Using cmd As SqlCommand = conn.CreateCommand()
    cmd.CommandText = "UPDATE ..."
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@UName", user.name)
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() 'fails with error
End Using

The error is:

A transport-level error has occurred when sending the request to the server. (provider: TCP Provider, error: 0 - An existing connection was forcibly closed by the remote host.)

I've tried restarting IIS and the SQL server and I'm totally out of ideas. I just need a fix

share|improve this question
    
Can you run other commands that use the same connection string somewhere else in your code? That is, can we confirm that your actual connection string works? – DOK Jan 31 '12 at 14:30
    
Yes, the code works via SMSS and also in other parts of the web app. – Echilon Jan 31 '12 at 14:33

You need to open the connection before calling SqlCommand.ExecuteNonQuery(). You do this by calling SqlConnection.Open().

Dim conn = New SqlConnection() 
conn.ConnectionString = "Data Source=someserver\sqlexpress2008;Initial Catalog=DatabaseName;User ID=sa;Password=pass" 
Using cmd As SqlCommand = conn.CreateCommand() 
    cmd.CommandText = "UPDATE ..." 
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@UName", user.name) 

    conn.Open()
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery() 'fails with error 
    conn.Close()
End Using 

Also, ensure you database isn't in single user mode.

share|improve this answer
    
Apologies, the connection is open, I omitted that line by mistake. – Echilon Jan 31 '12 at 14:28
    
@Echilon Is your database perhaps in single user mode? Try making multiple connections to it through SSMS. – user596075 Jan 31 '12 at 14:29

This helped another person who was stuck recently. You could examine the problem from the database server by setting up a SQL Server Profiler.

You can find lots of info about SQL Profiler by just googling around. Here's a site with a video that might help you get started. For starters, you would be able to see if the request is even reaching the database server.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great suggestion to run a SQL Trace. – user596075 Jan 31 '12 at 15:34

This is a network-level error. The database server is killing the connection for some reason. In order to troubleshoot this, I would open a connection using SSMS to the DEV and TEST servers and make sure that I can run simple queries w/o problems. It's unlikely that the issue is your library since you would be getting timeout or some other kind of errors.

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as Lcarus, said, database server is killing the connection for unknown reason. you can check the logs, to verfiy. Log path will be C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\<your instance>\MSSQL\LOG

from MSDN Blog MSDN Blog

this will occur when A connection is taken from the connection pool, the application does not know that the physical connection is gone, an attempt to use it is done under the assumption that the physical connection is still there.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

This was a nightmare to track down. It turned out to be cause by a horrible quirk in VB.NET. Nullable datetimes seem to be coerced to DateTime.MinValue, which resulted in a DateTime.MinValue being inserted into an sql datetime. The fix was to check for either !property.HasValue && property.Value != DateTime.MinValue when setting the parameters for the command.

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Don't see how that would cause the connection error... I would expect some error to be generated but not the one you were getting. – Christopher Klein Feb 2 '12 at 14:13
    
That's exactly what confused me, yet when I changed the values to DBNull.Value the query worked fine. – Echilon Feb 3 '12 at 14:21
    
What steps did you take to come to this conclusion? – schummbo Jul 4 '15 at 20:23

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