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Java string comparison?

I'm fairly new to Java and have a questions regarding why my if/else statements are failing to execute. The goal of the method is to load a 2d array based on symbols read in from a text file. The symbols are converted to numbers to fill the array. From what I can tell, the boolean logic that is used to determine whether or not the if or if/else statement should execute is sound, but none of them ever do. Thanks for the help.

Code:

public void loadText(Scanner sc) { 

   for (int row = 1; row <= grid.length; row++) {

       for (int col = 1; col <= grid[row].length; col++) {

           String x = sc.next();

           if ((x  == " ") && (row <= 10)) {
              grid[row][col] = 0;
           } else if ((x == "*") && (row <= 10)) {
               grid[row][col] = 1;         
           } else if ((x == "$") && (row <= 10)) {
               Arrays.fill(grid[row], 0);
           } else if (row >= 11) {
               break;
           }
       }
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marked as duplicate by Mat, mre, Jan Zyka, Robᵩ, Graviton Jan 31 '12 at 15:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
What is the value of x? –  recursive Jan 31 '12 at 14:50
    
try using .equals instead of == –  L7ColWinters Jan 31 '12 at 14:50
    
The indexes for Arrays starts at 0 –  PeekaySwitch Jan 31 '12 at 14:50
    
This is not a duplicate. He does not know that he is getting the string comparison wrong –  MozenRath Jan 31 '12 at 14:54
    
Well, what happens when you debug it? What is x when it's read from the Scanner? The conditionals seem a bit 'off' anyway - why repeat '(row <= 10)' three times when one check at the top would do? –  Martin James Jan 31 '12 at 14:58
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6 Answers 6

Compare strings using .equals or .equalsIgnoreCase.

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when comparing strings is a good practice to use

" ".equals(x) in stead of x == " "
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For your string comparison code you need to replace == with .equals() e.g.

if (" ".equals(x) && (row <=10)) {

}

== checks that two objects are the same object, the equals() methods checks that they represent the same thing. In Java equals() can be overrided by classes to do the right thing but == can't.

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The double equals sign compares addresses for anything that isn't a primitive.

As String is an instance of a class, you should use the equals method like this

for (int row = 1; row <= grid.length; row++) {

   for (int col = 1; col <= grid[row].length; col++) {

       String x = sc.next();

       if ((x.equals(" ")) && (row <= 10)) {
          grid[row][col] = 0;
       } else if ((x.equals("*")) && (row <= 10)) {
           grid[row][col] = 1;         
       } else if ((x.equals("$")) && (row <= 10)) {
           Arrays.fill(grid[row], 0);
       } else if (row >= 11) {
           break;
   }
}
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Or may be " ".equals(x) to be on the safe side for null value. –  Johnydep Jan 31 '12 at 15:43
    
This answer (and the others like it) resolved the issue. I truly appreciate the help, everyone. When I become more experienced, I hope I can give back to you all. Thanks. –  King Triumph Jan 31 '12 at 19:21
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you can use the char datatype instead of String for x to get your work done if the symbols are single character

(x == '$') && (row <= 10)

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idiot did you read the whole answer????? –  MozenRath Jan 31 '12 at 16:13
    
i said to use char instead of string –  MozenRath Jan 31 '12 at 16:13
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I think all the above answers are jumping to conclusion, yes I agree with most of them but your problem is that you dont know what x is.

You need to log it out but try adding a line

System.out.println(x);

You will see what is being compared. 

A test shows what you have could work;


import org.junit.Test;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;

public class BooleanLogicTest {

@Test
public void testLogical() {
  String x = " ";
  boolean result = x == " ";
  assertTrue("Could be true", result);
}

@Test
public void testCompare() {
  String x = " ";
  boolean result = " ".equals(x);
  assertTrue("Could be true", result);
}

@Test
public void testLogicalX() {
  String x = "*";
  boolean result = x == "*";
  assertTrue("Could be true", result);
} 

@Test
public void testCompareX() {
  String x = "*";
  boolean result = "*".equals(x);
  assertTrue("Could be true", result);
  System.out.println(x);
}

}

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1  
dont distract the new kid. you can give him a separate lesson on jUnits later –  MozenRath Jan 31 '12 at 15:04
    
Some explanation of why it was voted down please? Oh, you think that checking/testing is only valid when you have been programming for several years. Pathetic The only way to know why it failing is to find out what the value is and test it. Otherwise you are guessing. I guess you made the assumption that King Triumph doesn't want to know about testing, I didn't. –  Shawn Vader Jan 31 '12 at 15:05
    
that is not what i meant at all. you can probably answer most homework questions in this way after knowing an original answer –  MozenRath Jan 31 '12 at 15:09
    
I appreciate the input. I'm sure checking/testing will become very important and useful the further I get into learning Java. Currently, I'm not familiar with the code listed above. I do know what the value of x could be. My goal wasn't to test what x is, but to assign the element from the scanner to x so that it could be used to determine what statement to execute in the nested if/else section. –  King Triumph Jan 31 '12 at 17:28
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