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How can I search for two sequential newlines (\n) using perl? Or more specifically, why is a search for \n\n not successful even when they exist? I have a file with sequential newlines (verfied with a hex editor, they are not returns, etc.) but perl doesn't seem accept this regex.

perl -pi -e 's/\n\n/TEST/g' myfile.xml = no results

I'm actually trying to insert a bit of code into XML files but the linefeeds are in the middle, what's the most elegant way of doing so? I came up with a monstrous perl one liner but the double line feeds seem to cause the failure.

I want to change a portion of a gtkrc file from:

GtkWidget::link-color = @link_color
GtkWidget::visited-link-color = @text_color

####################
# Color Definitions
####################

to:

GtkWidget::link-color = @link_color
GtkWidget::visited-link-color = @text_color

GtkWindow::resize-grip-height = 0
GtkWindow::resize-grip-width = 0

####################
# Color Definitions
####################

Using the a portion of the original code as my search term (there are tabs before each line on the original script, btw), my find and replace terms were:

color\n\n\t\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\n\t\# Color

color\n\n\tGtkWindow::resize-grip-height = 0\n\tGtkWindow::resize-grip-width = 0\n\n\t\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\n\t\# Color

I came up with this big ugly perl command:

perl -pi -e 's/color\n\n\t\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\n\t\# Color/color\n\n\tGtkWindow::resize-grip-height = 0\n\tGtkWindow::resize-grip-width = 0\n\n\t\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\n\t\# Color/g' /usr/share/themes/Ambiance/gtk-2.0/gtkrc

EDIT: Corrected code from Zaid:

perl -0777 -pi -e 's/color\n\n\t\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\n\t\# Color/color\n\n\tGtkWindow::resize-grip-height = 0\n\tGtkWindow::resize-grip-width = 0\n\n\t\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\#\n\t\# Color/g' /usr/share/themes/Ambiance/gtk-2.0/gtkrc

As mentioned, it seems to be the \n\n that causes issues as anything else can be replaced. What is the better way to do this?

I'm on Ubuntu 11.10, command will be run from shell script and not perl script.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you open a file for reading, the file is by default read line by line. This is because the input record separator $/ is set to newline.

Since you are breaking each "line" on newline, it stands to reason that you can never find two newlines in a row in a single line.

One way to get around this is, as Zaid has said, to change the input record separator with the -0 flag. As long as the new input record separator is not partially matched by your regex, you will be fine. (As long as you do not try to match . to \n).

Let's make your regex a bit less horrid. You don't need to escape #, unless you are using the /x modifier. You don't need to use several # characters in a row, use a quantifier, +, * or {x,y}.

Instead of removing a string and then putting back an identical one, there are options to avoid typing the same thing twice.

  • You can avoid removing the string by using Lookaround Assertions.
  • You can use \K as a simplified Look-behind assertion (see above)
  • You can capture strings and put them back using $1, $2 ....

My preference in this case would be to use a look-behind assertion to find the "color\n\n" string, then a look-ahead to find the "Color" comment.

perl -0777 -pwe 's/(?<=color\n\n)(?=[#\s]+Color)/INSERT\n\n/' /path/to/file 

Where INSERT is of course your text to insert, which I removed for readability. I also removed the -i flag so you can try it out first.

share|improve this answer
    
I will give that a shot, thanks. I assumed I needed to escape all hashes so it wouldn't be interpreted as a comment when run from a shell script. My solution, as you noted, is horrid. Your use of capture strings is much more elegant. I'm only about 2 days into perl and have a lot to learn. –  Veazer Jan 31 '12 at 16:42
    
@user30441 It's not capture, it's look-around assertions. When used in a shell script, meta characters can become troublesome. It might be a whole lot easier to just put the code in a script and call that. E.g. perl /home/script.pl. –  TLP Jan 31 '12 at 16:48
    
Thanks for the clarification. I'm trying to avoid calling any outside scripts and your method worked well. –  Veazer Jan 31 '12 at 17:01

You need to load the whole file in one shot for \n\n to be detected. Use -0777 to override the default line-by-line behavior:

$ perl -0777 -pi -e 's/\n\n/TEST/g' myfile.xml
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect. Thanks for your quick and accurate answer. I've updated my question with the correct usage. –  Veazer Jan 31 '12 at 15:51
    
+1 Although you are overstating when saying "You need to". You only need to read the file with any other input record separator than a single newline. –  TLP Jan 31 '12 at 16:13
2  
Your Question is Asked Frequently, "I'm having trouble matching over more than one line. What's wrong?" learn.perl.org/faq/… –  tadmc Jan 31 '12 at 16:16
    
@tadmc- I'm sorry, i did try to search for this but my searches were to specific to my problem. –  Veazer Jan 31 '12 at 16:44
    
@Zaid, he doesn't really need to load the whole file, he could use that as a record separator, and thus the "\n\n" will be at the end. –  Axeman Feb 1 '12 at 13:05

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