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When I type simple objects to Chrome JavaScript Console, I get an output like this:

>true
true
>1/3
0.3333333333333333

And so on.

But a syntax error occurs when I type objects:

>{ a: 1, b: 2 }
SyntaxError: Unexpected token :
arguments: Array[1]
0: ":"
length: 1
__proto__: Array[0]
get message: function getter() { [native code] }
get stack: function getter() { [native code] }
set message: function setter() { [native code] }
set stack: function setter() { [native code] }
type: "unexpected_token"
__proto__: Error

While I know for sure that this expression could be correctly used in initializing an object, because:

>obj = { a: 1, b: 2 }
Object
a: 1
b: 2
__proto__: Object

Maybe it's a silly question, but I really want to know the reason why is this happening?

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4  
Try ({ a: 1, b: 2 }). –  Rocket Hazmat Jan 31 '12 at 15:28
3  
I know enough to tell you that this is because JavaScript is very particular about what is a valid expression and what is not. For example, function foo(){} is a Function Declaration but (function foo(){}) is a Function Expression due to the syntax rules, and they have different functional implications. I don't know the spec enough to point you to the exact wording that disallows {} as an expression but allows ({}) (try it!), but I do know the spec's insanity enough to tell you that that answer will likely just make you say "Huh. OK.". –  Phrogz Jan 31 '12 at 15:30
    
The best answer you're likely to get is similar to the reason that +[] equals 0, but +[]+[] equals the string "0". The reason is "because that's what the spec says to do", without any great insight into why the spec authors chose to make that decision. –  Phrogz Jan 31 '12 at 15:33
    
Interestingly, typing just {a:1} results in 1, again due to a different interpretation of what that happens to be. A great answer might also include why this is the case. An epic answer would show what confusion/conflict might occur if this expression were interpreted as we expect. –  Phrogz Jan 31 '12 at 15:35
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6 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because your statement is being evaluated as a block, not an object literal declaration.

Note that an ExpressionStatement cannot start with an opening curly brace because that might make it ambiguous with a Block. Also, an ExpressionStatement cannot start with the function keyword because that might make it ambiguous with a FunctionDeclaration.

To make it evaluate as an expression, it needs to be the right-hand side of an assignment, wrapped in parentheses or preceded by an operator. (!{a:1,b:2})

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!{a:1} doesn't really help when you want the value though ;) –  minitech Jan 31 '12 at 15:37
1  
@minitech: Nope, but it does force expression evaluation. As a practical application, you can use that property to shave a byte off of self-executing functions: !function(){...}(); instead of the traditional (function(){...})(); –  josh3736 Jan 31 '12 at 15:40
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 { a: 1, b: 2 }

is a code block, with two wrongly labelled variables.

To create an object, surround the code block by parentheses, so that the braces are interpreted as object literals:

({ a: 1, b: 2 })
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Interestingly enough, labelled variables work. It's the comma that's the problem, and if you change it to a semicolon it works too. Strange. You can embed URLs in JavaScript too then... –  minitech Jan 31 '12 at 15:39
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It's because an opening { with no context is interpreted as the beginning of a block. You can use parentheses:

({ a: 1, b: 2 })

As it is though, it's just a block of execution - like one might find after an if or for. So you can type:

{alert("Hello!");}

Here's more about that. Blocks sort of return values too, which is both awesome and disappointing.

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Because { a: 1, b: 2 } is not a valid expression to execute. JavaScript looks it like a block of code since it starts and ends to curly braces.

If you try ({ a: 1, b: 2 }), it will work.

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Because your statement is being evaluated as a block, not an object literal declaration.

True josh

If you want it to be evaluated as an object, just write :

> ({a : 1, b : 2})
Object
a: 1
b: 2
__proto__: Object
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Try this instead:

({ "a" : 1, "b" : 2 })
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