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I've got an overly complicated binary expression tree building system It takes in a string and a pair of objects (Player and World)

Each node on the tree represents an external function that takes a string, player and world, and either returns a bool (for tests) a string (for output) or void (for actions)

My problem is threefold: Firstly I need to use something like Expression.Condition or Expression.IfThenElse where the test Expression is of the form Expression<func<string, Player, World, bool>> rather than Expresson<bool> (as Expression.And would output)

Secondly I need to be sure that the memory reference for Player and World stay the same throughout - so that if one of the nodes in the tree updates something within Player, then it'll still be updated at the next node.

Finally I need to append all the strings, one to another.

If I could hard code the tree, it might end up looking something like this:

    class Main
    {
        string Foo(string text, World world, Player player)
        {
            string output;
            output += SomeClass.PrintStarting();
            if (SomeClass.Exists(text, world, player))
            {
                output += SomeClass.PrintName(text, world, player);
                SomeClass.KillPlayer(text, world, player);
                if (SomeClass.Exists(text, world, player))
                    output += SomeClass.PrintSurvived(text, world, player);
            }
            else
                output += SomeClass.PrintNotExists(text, world, player);
            return output;
        }
    }
    public class SomeClass
    {
        string PrintStart(string text, World world, Player player)
        {
            return "Starting.\n";
        }

        bool Exists(string text, World world, Player player)
        {
            player.Lives;
        }

        string PrintName(string text, World world, Player player)
        {
            return player.Name + ".\n";
        }

        string PrintSurvived(string text, World world, Player player)
        {
            return player.Name + "died.\n";
        }

        string PrintNotExists(string text, World world, Player player)
        {
            return "This person does not exist.\n";
        }

        void KillPlayer(string text, World world, Player player)
        {
            if (text != "kidding")
                player.Lives = false;
        }
    }

To further elaborate: I have an instance of SomeClass with all of its test/assign/string methods. I then go and create a list of Expression<func<string[], World, Player, bool>>, Expression<Action<string[], World, Player>> and Expression<func<string[], World, Player, string>> and start throwing them together into an expression tree. The actual ordering of what goes where I've dealt with leaving me with (for example):

    public string Foo2(string text, World world, Player player)
    {
        ParameterExpression result = Expression.Parameter(typeof(string), "result");
        ParameterExpression inputString = Expression.Parameter(typeof(string[]), "inputString");
        ParameterExpression inputWorld = Expression.Parameter(typeof(World), "inputWorld");
        ParameterExpression inputPlayer = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Player), "inputPlayer");
        System.Reflection.MethodInfo methodInfo = typeof(string).GetMethod("Concat", new Type[] { typeof(string), typeof(string) });

        Expression textPrintStarting = (Expression<Func<string, World, Player, string>>)((Text, World, Player) => SomeClass.PrintStarting(Text, World, Player));
        Expression testExists = (Expression<Func<string, World, Player, bool>>)((Text, World, Player) => SomeClass.Exists(Text, World, Player));
        Expression textPrintName = (Expression<Func<string, World, Player, string>>)((Text, World, Player) => SomeClass.PrintName(Text, World, Player));
        Expression killPlayer = (Expression<Action<string, World, Player>>)((Text, World, Player) => SomeClass.KillPlayer(Text, World, Player));
        Expression textPrintSurvived = (Expression<Func<string, World, Player, string>>)((Text, World, Player) => SomeClass.PrintSurvived(Text, World, Player));
        Expression textPrintNotExist = (Expression<Func<string, World, Player, string>>)((Text, World, Player) => SomeClass.PrintNotExists(Text, World, Player));


        Expression innerTest =
            Expression.Condition(
                Expression.Invoke(Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, bool>>(testExists, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer)),
                Expression.Assign(result, Expression.Call(methodInfo, result, Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(textPrintSurvived, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer))),
                Expression.Empty());

        Expression success = 
            Expression.Block(
                Expression.Assign(result, Expression.Call(methodInfo, result, Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(textPrintName, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer))),
                Expression.Lambda<Action<string, World, Player>>(killPlayer, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer),
                innerTest);

        Expression failure =
            Expression.Assign(result, Expression.Call(methodInfo, result, Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(textPrintNotExist, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer)));

        Expression outerTest = 
            Expression.Condition(
                Expression.Invoke(Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, bool>>(testExists, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer)),
                success,
                failure);

        Expression finalExpression =
            Expression.Block(
                Expression.Assign(result, Expression.Call(methodInfo, result, Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(textPrintStarting, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer))),
                outerTest);

        return Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(
                Expression.Block(new[] { result }, 
                finalExpression)).Compile()(text, world, player);
    }

The issue is with the Condition statements which throw a error because it cannot convert from Func to bool. I'm also unsure whether or not the parameters are getting passed in (as I've not been able to debug through)

share|improve this question
    
Could you elaborate? What you're saying in your problem doesn't make sense to me. What do you have (please give a specific example)? and what do you want to do with it (again, please be specific)? What expressions do you have and how do you intend to use them? –  Jeff Mercado Jan 31 '12 at 17:55
    
I've added additional detail with my current implementation of the problem –  bigjokerfish Feb 1 '12 at 10:22
    
Any particular reason why you want all that as an expression? I see no need for it at all. If you want an example of the expression and to see if it's practically possible, you could store the function as a lambda expression. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 3 '12 at 3:07
    
The reason that each of these are expression is so that I can build them into an expression tree. –  bigjokerfish Feb 3 '12 at 9:26
    
The final program will have a good portion of it's code as dynamically generated expression trees. The trees will be built up from alterable config files and may be simple (like the one above) or more complicated. I would like to have it as a binary tree, except that the nodes have to do more than just tests (which have to be separate expressions) and that the expressions represent functions that return bools rather than just returning bools. The if statements may also be much more complicated. –  bigjokerfish Feb 3 '12 at 9:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After much dabbling with MethodInfo, I discovered that when I was writing:

Expression innerTest =
    Expression.Condition(
        Expression.Invoke(Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, bool>>(testExists, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer)),
        Expression.Assign(result, Expression.Call(methodInfo, result, Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(textPrintSurvived, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer))),
        Expression.Empty());

the Expression.Lambda was adding a layer of complexity to my code by turning Func<string, World, Player, string> into Func<string, World, Player, Func<string, World, Player, string>>

The Expression.Invoke stripped away this added layer which at first confused me. With this startling revelation I updated this to:

 Expression innerTest =
        Expression.IfThen(
            Expression.Invoke(testExists, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer),
            Expression.Assign(result, Expression.Call(methodInfo, result, Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(textPrintSurvived, inputString, inputWorld, inputPlayer))));
share|improve this answer

I took a shot at expressing that code as an expression. This is what I came up with. I don't know if it works as intended for all cases but it compiles and seems to work in my tests.

// reference method
static string Foo(string text, World world, Player player)
{
    string output = SomeClass.PrintStarting();
    if (SomeClass.Exists(text, world, player))
    {
        output += SomeClass.PrintName(text, world, player);
        SomeClass.KillPlayer(text, world, player);
        if (SomeClass.Exists(text, world, player))
            output += SomeClass.PrintSurvived(text, world, player);
    }
    else
        output += SomeClass.PrintNotExists(text, world, player);
    return output;
}
// helper method
static Expression AddAssignStrings(ParameterExpression left, Expression right)
{
    var stringType = typeof(string);
    var concatMethod = stringType.GetMethod("Concat", new[] { stringType, stringType });
    return Expression.Assign(
        left,
        Expression.Call(concatMethod, left, right)
    );
}

var text = Expression.Parameter(typeof(string), "text");
var world = Expression.Parameter(typeof(World), "world");
var player = Expression.Parameter(typeof(Player), "player");
var output = Expression.Variable(typeof(string), "output");

// looks safe to reuse this array for the expressions
var arguments = new ParameterExpression[] { text, world, player };

var someClassType = typeof(SomeClass);
// assuming the methods are all publicly accessible
var printStartingMethod = someClassType.GetMethod("PrintStarting");
var existsMethod = someClassType.GetMethod("Exists");
var printNameMethod = someClassType.GetMethod("PrintName");
var killPlayerMethod = someClassType.GetMethod("KillPlayer");
var printSurvivedMethod = someClassType.GetMethod("PrintSurvived");
var printNotExistsMethod = someClassType.GetMethod("PrintNotExists");

var ifTrueBlockContents = new Expression[]
{
    AddAssignStrings(output, Expression.Call(printNameMethod, arguments)),

    Expression.Call(killPlayerMethod, arguments),

    Expression.IfThen(
        Expression.Call(existsMethod, arguments),
        AddAssignStrings(output, Expression.Call(printSurvivedMethod, arguments))
    ),
};

var blockContents = new Expression[]
{
    Expression.Assign(output, Expression.Call(printStartingMethod)),

    Expression.IfThenElse(
        Expression.Call(existsMethod, arguments),
        Expression.Block(ifTrueBlockContents),
        AddAssignStrings(output, Expression.Call(printNotExistsMethod, arguments))
    ),

    output,
};

var body = Expression.Block(typeof(string), new ParameterExpression[] { output }, blockContents);

var lambda = Expression.Lambda<Func<string, World, Player, string>>(body, arguments);

Here's the debug view of the expression:

.Lambda #Lambda1<System.Func`4[System.String,Test.World,Test.Player,System.String]>(
    System.String $text,
    Test.World $world,
    Test.Player $player) {
    .Block(System.String $output) {
        $output = .Call Test.SomeClass.PrintStarting();
        .If (
            .Call Test.SomeClass.Exists(
                $text,
                $world,
                $player)
        ) {
            .Block() {
                $output = .Call System.String.Concat(
                    $output,
                    .Call Test.SomeClass.PrintName(
                        $text,
                        $world,
                        $player));
                .Call Test.SomeClass.KillPlayer(
                    $text,
                    $world,
                    $player);
                .If (
                    .Call Test.SomeClass.Exists(
                        $text,
                        $world,
                        $player)
                ) {
                    $output = .Call System.String.Concat(
                        $output,
                        .Call Test.SomeClass.PrintSurvived(
                            $text,
                            $world,
                            $player))
                } .Else {
                    .Default(System.Void)
                }
            }
        } .Else {
            $output = .Call System.String.Concat(
                $output,
                .Call Test.SomeClass.PrintNotExists(
                    $text,
                    $world,
                    $player))
        };
        $output
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For the code, I assumed SomeClass was static. I couldn't think of a nice way to express it as an instance variable that wasn't declared within the block. But you should be able to adjust it to fit your needs. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 4 '12 at 5:12
    
p.s., Don't use Expression.Condition here, it corresponds to the conditional operator, ?: (aka, the "ternary" operator) and that's not what you actually have in the code. –  Jeff Mercado Feb 4 '12 at 6:09
    
I've avoided passing around methodinfo, for the methods as it restricts what I can do with my original classes. The additional flexibility granted by using lambdas over straight methodinfo would require more complicated examples –  bigjokerfish Feb 5 '12 at 10:36

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