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Given this:

$ids = '';

I just realized that this:

$single = $ids == FALSE || is_array($ids)? FALSE : TRUE;
var_dump($single);

and this:

if ($ids == FALSE) 
{
    $single = TRUE;     
}
else 
{
    if (is_array($ids)) 
    {
        $single = FALSE;
    } 
    else 
    {
        $single = TRUE;
    }
}
var_dump($single);

Display different results (false and true respectively). However, This only happens when the variable is:

$ids = '';

or

$ids;

If $ids is an array, an integer, or a string it works fine. Does anybody know why? Thanks in advance!

By the way, I have just realized that if you type $ids === FALSE in the first conditional stament (the single line one) it will work fine. But I still don't understand the 'logic' behind this.

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i.e. codepad.org/zue3hIoK –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '12 at 16:27
2  
Get out of the habit of describing things as "working fine". It requires an assumption as to what "working fine" means, that may not be correct. Instead, describe behaviours. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '12 at 16:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You forgot parentheses:

$single = (($ids == FALSE) || (is_array($ids)? FALSE : TRUE));
var_dump($single);

// Output: true

Live demo.

Without them, precedence gives you a result different from that which you were expecting:

<?php
$id = '';

$single =  $ids ==  FALSE ||  is_array($ids)? FALSE : TRUE;
//        (        (                        )             )
//                   FALSE                    FALSE

var_dump($single); // False


$single = (($ids == FALSE) || (is_array($ids)? FALSE : TRUE));
//              TRUE       ||       FALSE

var_dump($single); // True
?>

Note that '' == FALSE is true; I'm not sure whether you realised that.

share|improve this answer
1  
And even better would be: $single = $ids == FALSE || !is_array($ids); –  Felix Kling Jan 31 '12 at 16:30
    
Thanks a lot, now I get it... it is always that little details that gives me a headache :) –  John Shepard Jan 31 '12 at 16:32
    
See my comments at @Juhana's answer. The expression is evaluated differently. –  Felix Kling Jan 31 '12 at 16:35
    
@Felix: Way ahead of you :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 31 '12 at 16:35
    
By the way LR0, that is one of the best answers I have ever got in Stackoverflow. Thanks a lot man –  John Shepard Jan 31 '12 at 16:44

The order of operations is different in the two examples. The first one is parsed as:

$single = ( $ids == FALSE || is_array($ids) ) ? FALSE : TRUE;

The second one is equal to:

$single = ( $ids == FALSE ) || ( is_array($ids)? FALSE : TRUE );
share|improve this answer
1  
Are you sure that the first one is not: ($ids == FALSE || is_array($ids)) ? FALSE : TRUE? –  Felix Kling Jan 31 '12 at 16:31
    
@FelixKling Good point. –  Juhana Jan 31 '12 at 16:33
    
According to the precedence table || is stronger than ? :. –  Felix Kling Jan 31 '12 at 16:34
    
Thanks anyway Juhana –  John Shepard Jan 31 '12 at 16:38

I could be wrong but It may be because you are returning a Boolean Equivlenant (1 / 0) or a True and False String. If you want Absolute equality try using 3 equals symbols.

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