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I have a list List A consisted of strings {"a", "b", "c", "d", "e"}. My program runs in iterations and for each iteration I want to create a new list List B which is going to contain the same strings, but each of them should move to one position to the left. Here is the example of what the List B should look like in first three iterations:

  1. iteration, the List B should be: listB = {"a", "b", "c", "d", "e"}
  2. iteration, the List B should be: listB = {"b", "c", "d", "e", "a"}
  3. iteration, the List B should be: listB = {"c", "d", "e", "a", "b"}
    and so on...

I have achieved the desired functionality with the following method:

private List<string> CalculateQueueOrder(List<string> listA, int iterationNum)
{
    int listACount = listA.Count;
    List<string> listB = new List<string>();

    for (int i = 0; i < listACount; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < listACount; j++)
        {
            int order = ((j - iterationNum) % listACount + 1);
            if (order == i)
            {
                string listItem = listA[j];
                listB.Add(listItem);
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    return listB;
}

However, there is an issue with this method. In time as the number of iterations increases, the j - iterationNum starts returning negative values, which makes modulus start returning negative values as well. The whole function fails. I need to make the modulus always return the positive value, like it does in Microsofot Excel (mod function).

Could you help me out fixing the formula for int order? Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
Are you committed to this double loop paradigm? I would think you could figure out based on the list size and iteration number, in O(1) time, how much you'd need to shift by, and then simply build a new list. – Erik Dietrich Jan 31 '12 at 16:41
    
@ErikDietrich Any solution is fine. I don't mind dropping the 2 loops idea. Could you help me out? – Boris Jan 31 '12 at 16:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I achieved this here: http://rextester.com/HXACA68585

Method is:

    private static IEnumerable<T> Cycle<T>(List<T> data, int num)
    {
        var start = num%data.Count;
        for(var i=0;i<data.Count;i++)
        {
            yield return data[(i+start)%data.Count];
        }
    }

Which you can stuff back into a new list if you wanted:

List<string> list = new List<string>(){"a", "b", "c", "d", "e"};
List<string> newList = new List<string>(Cycle(list,2)); // contains c, d, e, a, b

But to test your required results used this:

List<string> list = new List<string>(){"a", "b", "c", "d", "e"};
Dump(Cycle(list,0));
Dump(Cycle(list,1));
Dump(Cycle(list,2));
Dump(Cycle(list,3));
Dump(Cycle(list,4));
Dump(Cycle(list,5));
Dump(Cycle(list,6));

Output as follows:

a, b, c, d, e
b, c, d, e, a
c, d, e, a, b
d, e, a, b, c
e, a, b, c, d
a, b, c, d, e
b, c, d, e, a
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! This solves my issue. – Boris Feb 1 '12 at 9:18

That's one hell of a convoluted way to do the job, and it doesn't actually work at all, not only when iterationNum is too large. This should help:

int order = ((listACount + j - iterationNum % listACount + 1) % listACount);

And a simpler way, just in case:

private List<string> CalculateQueueOrder(List<string> list, int iterationNum) {
    iterationNum = (iterationNum - 1) % list.Count;
    return list.Skip(iterationNum).Concat(list.Take(iterationNum)).ToList();
}

Both methods assume that iteration starts from 1, not 0, i.e. if iterationNum equals to 1, the function returns the original list.

share|improve this answer
    
the int order calculation fails after 5th iteration if there are 5 items in a list. As for the second solution, could you explain what you mean by Skip and Take methods? Thanks. – Boris Feb 1 '12 at 8:48
    
ok, now it should work for all numbers, even for negative. :> – user1096188 Feb 1 '12 at 9:17
    
as for skip and take, these are part of LINQ. These two methods return a modified version of the collection they were called on. 'Skip' just skips first n elements, and returns the rest. 'Take' takes first n elements, and throws away the remaining ones. Concat just appends one collection to another. So these three methods just take first n elements of a collection and append them to the end, which is exactly what you need to do. LINQ is a relatively broad topic, and one of the things that make c# one damn fine language (compared to java), so i highly advise you to read more about it. – user1096188 Feb 1 '12 at 9:29
    
Thanks man, that clarifies it! – Boris Feb 1 '12 at 9:41

Try

int order = ((j - iterationNum) % listACount + 1);
if (order < 0) order += listACount + 1;

for a quick fix. Although I would try to rewite the method, that double loop should be unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
    
That won't work I am afraid. – Boris Jan 31 '12 at 16:46
    
Why not, how does it fail? – Andreas Baus Jan 31 '12 at 16:46
    
If there are 5 list items in listA, like in the question above, adding you line fails in the second iteration: string "a" does not move to the last position in the listB. – Boris Jan 31 '12 at 16:52

You solution is O(N^2) while it can be solved in O(N) time:

int iterationNumber = 2 % listA.Count; // substitute 2 with whatever number you want
List<string> listA = new List<string> { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e", "f" };

var listB = listA.Skip(iterationNumber).Concat(listA.Take(iterationNumber));
share|improve this answer

Alright, second attempt:

    public List<string> CalculateQueueOrder(List<string> list, int shift) {
        int len = list.Count;
        int start = shift % len;

        List<string> newList = new List<string>();
        for (int i = start; i < len; ++i) {
            newList.Add(list[i]);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < start; ++i) {
            newList.Add(list[i]);
        }

        return newList;
    }
share|improve this answer
var orglist = new List<string>() { "a", "b", "c", "d", "e" };

foreach (var list in CalculateQueueOrder(orglist))    
{
      Console.WriteLine(String.Join(" ",list));
}

IEnumerable<List<string>> CalculateQueueOrder(List<string> list)
{
    //yield return list; //if you need the original list
    for (int i = 0; i < list.Count-1; i++)
    {
        var newList = new List<string>(list.Skip(1));
        newList.Add(list.First());
        list  = newList;
        yield return newList;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here's some code that I slapped together with a better runtime. It works for the included unit tests, and you can tweak from there if I didn't nail it exactly first time through...

[TestClass]
public class ScratchPadTest
{

    private int CalculateShift(int listCount, int iterations)
    {
        if (listCount == 0)
        { 
            return 0;
        }
        return iterations % listCount;
    }



    private List<string> PerformShift(List<string> list, int iterations)
    {
        var myShiftCount = CalculateShift(list.Count, iterations);
        var myList = new List<string>();

        for (int index = 0; index < myShiftCount; index++)
        {
            myList.Add(list[(index + myShiftCount) % list.Count]);
        }
        return myList;
    }

    [TestMethod, Owner("ebd"), TestCategory("Proven"), TestCategory("Unit")]
    public void ZeroIterationsReturns0()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual<int>(0, CalculateShift(0, 0));

    }

    [TestMethod, Owner("ebd"), TestCategory("Proven"), TestCategory("Unit")]
    public void OneITerationReturnsOne_With_List_Size_Two()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual<int>(1, CalculateShift(2, 1));
    }

    [TestMethod, Owner("ebd"), TestCategory("Proven"), TestCategory("Unit")]
    public void OneIterationReturns_Zero_With_ListSizeOne()
    {
        Assert.AreEqual<int>(0, CalculateShift(1, 1));            
    }

    [TestMethod, Owner("ebd"), TestCategory("Proven"), TestCategory("Unit")]
    public void Shifting_Two_Element_List_By_101_Reverses_Elements()
    {
        var myList = new List<string>() { "1", "2" };

        Assert.AreEqual<string>("2", PerformShift(myList, 101)[0]);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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