Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The webViewDidFinishLoad message seems to be sent each time any object in the page has been loaded. Is there a way to determine that all loading of content is done?

share|improve this question
add comment

8 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Interesting, I wouldn't have thought it would work like that. Although I'm sure there are other ways to do it (is there a way to extract the URL from the webViewDidFinishLoad message so that you can see which one is the main page finishing loading?), the main thing I can think of is using the estimatedProgress to check the progress of the page and fire off whatever you want to do when it's 100% finished loading, which is what I do in my app. Google "iphone webview estimatedprogress" and click the first link for a guide I wrote on how to do this.

Update:

Please use phopkins' answer below instead of mine! Using private APIs in your apps is a bad idea and you will probably get rejected, and his solution is the right one.

share|improve this answer
    
estimatedProgress did the trick, thank you –  chendral May 27 '09 at 21:50
    
I have similar problem in one of my apps & implemented AriX's solution - however, my question is whether Apple honestly allows this into the app store? One of the comments seems to suggest they don't (at least they didn't in 2009.) Has anyone had more recent experience with this? –  Jon Mar 11 '12 at 3:10
2  
I believe that at some point, Apple allowed such apps into their store, but I can confirm that they currently do not. I submitted an app using this API in November, and it was rejected. Why does Apple still not allow developers to access the progress of a web view, four years after the launch of the iPhone SDK? Who knows. –  AriX Apr 9 '12 at 17:47
    
Actually, my app is just rejected from AppStore because of using non-public "_documentView". Be careful. :-) –  Tsuneo Yoshioka Jan 7 '13 at 21:03
add comment

I'm guessing that iframes cause the webViewDidStartLoad / webViewDidFinishLoad pair.

The [webView isLoading] check mentioned as an answer didn't work for me; it returned false even after the first of two webViewDidFinishLoad calls. Instead, I keep track of the loading as follows:

- (void)webViewDidStartLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {
  webViewLoads_++;
}


- (void)webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {
  webViewLoads_--;

  if (webViewLoads_ > 0) {
    return;
  }

  …
}

- (void)webView:(UIWebView*)webView didFailLoadWithError:(NSError*)error {
  webViewLoads_--;
}

(Note this will only work if the start / finished pairs don't come serially, but in my experience so far that hasn't happened.)

share|improve this answer
2  
@phopkins add this :) (void)webView:(UIWebView*)webView didFailLoadWithError:(NSError*)error { -- webViewLoads_; } –  user692463 Apr 5 '11 at 8:13
    
In my experience that happens with some JQuery-javascript-stuff... –  Emil Jun 17 '11 at 15:48
4  
I hate hacking to do silly workarounds like this - but this is still better than the accepted answer, which involves using private Apple APIs. Thanks for you answer. –  nont Feb 15 '12 at 2:06
1  
Did not work for me. The pending counter hit zero several times on its way to completion. I am downloading several different UIWebViews simultaneously. –  Bill Cheswick Apr 3 '13 at 14:59
1  
Same as Ches. This did not work for me at all. Le sigh. –  Joe D'Andrea Dec 23 '13 at 21:09
show 3 more comments

Another way to monitor load progress with less control is to observe the WebViewProgressEstimateChangedNotification, WebViewProgressFinishedNotification, and WebViewProgressStartedNotification notifications. For example, you could observe these notifications to implement a simple progress indicator in your application. You update the progress indicator by invoking the estimatedProgress method to get an estimate of the amount of content that is currently loaded.

from http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/Cocoa/Reference/WebKit/Classes/WebView_Class/Reference/Reference.html

share|improve this answer
3  
That is for Mac, it doesn't work for UIWebView –  Coolant Jan 22 '13 at 12:43
add comment

You can also use this short Category I wrote that adds blocks into UIWebView and also lets you choose between default UIWebView behavior (getting notified after each object load), or the "expected" behavior (getting notified only when the page has fully loaded).

https://github.com/freak4pc/UIWebView-Blocks

share|improve this answer
    
This did not work for me by blowing up with a signal (SIGTRAP, I believe). Though, I read the code and used its logic on mine, and it worked fine. –  Pedro Morte Rolo Jan 11 '13 at 17:05
1  
Weird, works fine for me, not sure what was your exact usage but feel free to write it here if you want to. Cheers. –  Shai Mishali Jan 11 '13 at 21:15
1  
Shai, Your lib is a good idea and it is well designed. –  Pedro Morte Rolo Jan 14 '13 at 12:20
    
If there is any problem please feel free to pull your copy and add a fix :) –  Shai Mishali Jan 14 '13 at 15:27
add comment

hi it may be a bit far back already but i hope this helps.

i just used a notification when it enters the webViewDidFinishLoad method so that i can capture one instance of the method and then i'll detect the notification and do my logic from there.

hope this helps. it does not capture the last called instance of the webViewDidFinishLoad method, but allows you to do something once it has been called and not be repeated calls to that particular method (eg. showing a button) too.

*********EDIT*********

i did a test and managed to test it out. it actually works and the method called from the notification will be called after the full page has been loaded.

alternatively, i think you can do a counter on the delegate method webViewDidStartLoad and also on webViewDidFinishLoad to make sure that they are the same before you run your codes. this though, is an ugly hack as we will never know how many times it will be called unless like me, you are loading a html feed and can add a JavaScript to check how many elements there are on the page that you are loading. i'm just sharing some of the methods i have tried to solve this. hope it helps.

feedback is encouraged. thanks!

share|improve this answer
    
What's the difference beween putting your code in webViewDidFinishLoad and making a notification in webViewDidFinishLoad to call another method? –  Aaron Brager Mar 8 '13 at 15:11
    
depends on what your code does actually. notification fires off another bunch of codes, so if you already have a method or something that is required to run separately, or concurrently, then i guess it might be better to call another method then. if not it really depends what your code does i guess. –  faterpig Aug 13 '13 at 7:28
add comment

I needed to capture a variable from the page which was not fully loaded yet.

This worked for me:

- (void) webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {
    NSString *valueID = [webView stringByEvaluatingJavaScriptFromString:@"document.valueID;"];

    if([valueID isEqualToString:@""]){
        [webView reload];
        return;
    }

    //page loaded
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

All of the options did not really work for my use case. I used phopkins example slightly modified. I found that if the HTML loaded into the webview contained an image that would be a separate request that happened serially so we have to account for that and I did that with a timer. Not the best solution but it seems to work.:

- (void)webViewActuallyFinished {
     _webViewLoads--;

    if (_webViewLoads > 0) {
        return;
    }

    //Actually done loading

}

- (void)webViewDidStartLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {
    _webViewLoads++;
}


- (void)webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webView {


    [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:2 target:self selector:@selector(webViewActuallyFinished) userInfo:nil repeats:NO];
}

- (void)webView:(UIWebView *)webView didFailLoadWithError:(NSError *)error {
  _webViewLoads--;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The way I do it is this:

- (void)webViewDidFinishLoad:(UIWebView *)webview  {
    if (webview.loading)
    return;
    // now really done loading code goes next
    [logic]
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. Fires multiple times. –  ZaBlanc Dec 17 '10 at 15:49
1  
It definitely doesn't work. It is false each time "webViewDidFinishLoad" is called. But then, it still get called multiple times. Yes, 2 starts and THREE finishes. Example: Starting Load -- article 23 Reasons to Get Out There 1, Starting Load -- article 23 Reasons to Get Out There 1, Finish Load -- article 23 Reasons to Get Out There 0, Finish Load -- article 23 Reasons to Get Out There 0, Finish Load -- article 23 Reasons to Get Out There 0 –  christophercotton Feb 24 '11 at 17:13
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.