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I am testing performance on integer addition in Java. The way I did that is by summing up billions of integers. The sample file I use for testing is a 1G binary file. My program is as simple as shown in the snippet below.

int result = 0;
FileChannel fileChannel = new FileInputStream(filename).getChannel();
long fileSize = fileChannel.size();
intBuffer = fileChannel.map(MapMode.READ_ONLY, startPosition, fileSize).asIntBuffer();

try {
  while (true) {
    result += intBuffer.get();
  }
} catch (BufferUnderflowException e) {
  System.out.println("Complete reading");
}

As you can see from above, it simply executes two operations in each loop

  • read integer from file
  • integer addition

This program ran about 2 minutes on my machine. I also did another test run without addition, by changing result += intBuffer.get() to result = intBuffer.get() (shown as in following snippet).

int result = 0;
FileChannel fileChannel = new FileInputStream(filename).getChannel();
long fileSize = fileChannel.size();
intBuffer = fileChannel.map(MapMode.READ_ONLY, startPosition, fileSize).asIntBuffer();

try {
  while (true) {
    result = intBuffer.get();
  }
} catch (BufferUnderflowException e) {
  System.out.println("Complete reading");
}

The entire program in this case turned out to complete within 1 second. Compared to its sibling variant above, it seems integer addition dominate the CPU time compared to IO read.

I wrote another benchmark program just for justify my guess, it does the same number of additions as the above example.

int result = random.nextInt();
int other = random.nextInt();
int num = 1073741824 / 4;
while(num-- > 0) {
  result += other;
}

With the same amount of integer additions plus the integer incremental operations, this program finishes less than 1 second.

My question is

  • What caused the the major timing difference between these runs? Does Java compiler does something to optimize the last one?

Any thoughts are appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
You might want to clarify what you mean by "the 2nd one". I take it to mean your test where you did result = intBuffer.get(), but 2 answers (so far) seem to assume you mean the one where you use random.nextInt(). –  vaughandroid Jan 31 '12 at 17:12
1  
This happens because OS keeps recently used files in memory. Try runing the test one more time in reverse order. –  Banthar Jan 31 '12 at 17:16
    
@Baqueta, I adjusted my wording to make the question more clear. –  Chen Jan 31 '12 at 17:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

That's because disk I/O is very slow compared the CPU.

In the first case, you're reading from a file. So you're bound by disk-access.

In the second case, it's all in the CPU.


So this has nothing to do with the speed of addition.

  • The first case is limited by the speed of your disk.
  • The second case is (probably) limited by the speed of the random number generator.

As for why result = intBuffer.get() seems to be very fast: (pulled from comments)

Two possible reasons I can think of:

  • Dead Code Elimination by the JIT is optimizing out all but the last iteration.
  • I/O buffering: The OS is buffering the entire file into memory after the first read.*

*So subsequent passes will be very fast. It's easy to test for this case by re-ordering the tests or clearing the I/O cache each time

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He said his 2nd test run had no addition and was just reading from the same file and finished in 1 second. –  Nick Rolando Jan 31 '12 at 17:10
    
The first case, I also tested without any integer addition, by replacing statement in the loop from result += intBuffer.get() with result = intBuffer.get()and it completes within 1 second. –  Chen Jan 31 '12 at 17:11
1  
This could be due to Dead Code Elimination. I'm not sure though... Perhaps the JIT is smart enough to realize that the only the last iteration matters... –  Mysticial Jan 31 '12 at 17:12
    
@Mysticial Aye, that would make sense. –  Nick Rolando Jan 31 '12 at 17:15
    
Alternatively, it could also be due to buffering. After the first pass over the data, the OS has the entire file buffered in memory. So subsequent passes will be very fast. It's easy to test for this case by re-ordering the tests or clearing the I/O cache each time. –  Mysticial Jan 31 '12 at 17:16

The big difference is that you are doing file IO. Summing the integers isn't the problem. But it's reading them. I'm not very sure, but I think that reading one GB of data in two minutes is acceptable.

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This is because I/O access is your bottle neck. Count time only on addition phase. You can always load all data to RAM (an int array for example) and start counting time from this point.

Whatever benchmark you do, keep in mind that data preparation phase shouldn't be counted to algorithm's execution time.

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