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I recently started programming for iOS and would like to know what are the main differences between using Storyboards instead of xib files. Specifically, what are the advantages and/or disadvantages of using a Storyboard? Unfortunately, despite doing quite a bit of research, all I've been able to find on Storyboards are simple tutorials that show you how to set up a Storyboard, instead of concrete information explaining what they are. Any information would be greatly appreciated; thank you very much for your time and answers.

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If you plan on targeting devices running < iOS 5 storyboards are out. –  NJones Jan 31 '12 at 17:23

8 Answers 8

up vote 62 down vote accepted

A Storyboard is:

  • A container for all your Scenes (View Controllers, Nav Controllers, TabBar Controllers, etc)
  • A manager of connections and transitions between these scenes (these are called Segues)
  • A nice way to manage how different controllers talk to each other
  • Storyboards give you a complete look at the flow of your application that you can never get from individual nib files floating around.
  • A reducer of all the "clutter" that happens when you have several controllers each with it's own nib file.

I have been using Storyboards for awhile now and the ONLY downside is that you can't target iOS 4 or below. Storyboards only work on devices running iOS 5 or better. Other than that, the benefits are many and the downsides are non-existent IMO.

The best tutorial I have seen is Ray Wenderlich's

Also, if you are a member of the Apple Developer program, check out last years WWDC session on Storyboards (iTunesU), it is awesome.

Another great one (also on iTunesU) is the latest Stanford iOS Application Programming course.

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Is it your post, isn't it? developer.blog.appxtream.com/?p=46 –  Wojtek Rutkowski Feb 6 '13 at 2:03
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Nope, looks like someone did some copying and pasting. I posted this on Stackoverflow 10 months before Danial's post. You're right though, looks almost identical lol. –  LJ Wilson Feb 6 '13 at 11:30
    
Yes, I saw the dates. cmd+c cmd+v was in the move, indeed! –  Wojtek Rutkowski Feb 7 '13 at 15:14
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By law, the person is allowed to copy only if they give credits to a real author :) as the content has creative commons rights. I have done copy paste before but done that in a right way. touchfever.blogspot.com.au/2012/06/… For future copy paster! :) –  doNotCheckMyBlog Feb 7 '13 at 20:24
    
It appears that site isn't updated much anymore, so not going to worry about it. –  LJ Wilson Feb 7 '13 at 20:42

There are not only pro sides of Storyboarding, also cons - just because you asked for input:

  • it's not easy to work with SBs in a team, since only one participant can work on the SB at once (because it's one file).

-The following is not true: - if you need to do things SB doesn't offer, it's not quite easy to get SB mixed with programatical created views (well, it is possible though)

The rule of thumb seems to be: the more complex you expect your project to get, the more you'll better not go for SB.

EDIT: - another disadvantage of SB: working around all the annoying bugs of XCode regarding SB. E.g. having to frequently flush the DerivedData folder because of several inconsistencies. Sometimes storyboard files or the link to them get corrupted. Then you might have the joy to search for the problem. Take a look at this thread to get the idea

EDIT 2 (March 2013): meanwhile Storyboards and Xcode are working much better, and documentation and best practices are wide spread. I think working with storyboard can be recommended for a majority of projects, even if there are still some glitches.

EDIT 3 (Sept 2013): now with the new Xcode 5 format working in teams with SB might get even better, as it seems to become possible to merge SB-code much easier now.

Another EDIT: well, if you have an hour of time, sit back, relax and listen to these guys discussing this topic (Ray Wenderlich & Co)

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I'd be very interested in seeing an example of your second point. –  Sebastien Feb 18 '13 at 14:47
    
Actually, it's quite easy to mix SB with non-SB code. Here's a discussion on how to do it: developer.apple.com/videos/wwdc/2012/?id=407 –  jbbenni Mar 3 '13 at 22:58
    
@jbbenni: you are right. Meanwhile documentation has become much better and many bugs are fixed. I'll edit my answer. –  brainray Mar 4 '13 at 9:51
    
Working with Storyboards and source control can be a little annoying, as @brainray is alluding to –  NSTJ Apr 17 '13 at 15:05

There was a nice presentation about Storyboard given at the LiDG meeting a couple of months ago.

Personally, I'd say it's the way to go with a new app. There are some gaps, especially for very complex apps, but the pro's mostly outweigh the cons.

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It would be nice to have something a little more detailed but not as soporific as the typical Apple stuff. –  Hot Licks Jan 31 '12 at 17:24
    
Thank you so much.. the Presentation is awesome!! –  RDC Jun 19 at 7:17

Be careful, if you use Storyboards your app is not backwards compatible with older OS installations.

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This is almost always a concern when using a new feature or API. If this is going to be an application for sale in the App store, then this surely deserves some thought. Considering just how many iPhone 4S's were sold last quarter and how many devices have updated to iOS 5, this is not near the concern that most think it is. It is also highly important to stay current with the latest features and API's or you as a developer will get left behind fast. –  LJ Wilson Feb 1 '12 at 8:47
    
It is true that you should keep up with the latest features and API's. I always try and come up with a project so I can experiment with the new features when they are released, but I try to keep the new stuff out of my released apps until they have been around for a while. Admittedly storyboards are almost to the point where they should be considered. –  Beleg Jun 26 '12 at 19:33
    
Storyboards are about 8 months past the point of being used in production apps. Since they co-exist so easily with existing nibs and iOS 5 has been adopted by over 85% of the iOS user base, I don't see a reason not to use them. I have 10+ production apps using some level of storyboard UI. –  LJ Wilson Jun 26 '12 at 22:57
    
This is a known fact when starting to use storyboards. The answer does not give a complete story... –  Johan Karlsson Jun 5 '13 at 5:36
    
To earn an upvote you need to spend more time writing your answers. Stating the obvious is not enough. The question was about which advantages/disadvantages for Storyboards. –  Johan Karlsson Jun 13 '13 at 10:49

A storyboard is basically a device to make your job as a developer easier. It is complied into a series of nib files, so the performance is pretty much equivalent, but it's great as a developer to be able to look at a quick overview of your entire application flow.

I'm starting to transition to using storyboards on new projects, providing I can convince the client to accept iOS 5 as a minimum version. This is purely because I prefer to do it this way, and it takes me less time to accomplish the same tasks.

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Some more benefits of storyboards:

  • Storyboards have better support for tableviews. That is you can use "Dynamic" and "Prototype" cells.
  • It is easier to instantiate view controllers using storyboards. You can do stuff like: [se lf.storyboard instantiateViewControllerWithIdentifer:]
  • Storyboards support view controller containers, so you can have child view controllers layed out graphically.

Downsides are:

  • Storyboards are slow to render in XCode when they contain lots of view controllers

  • Autolayout can not be enabled for one view controller in the storyboard.

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Your attitude toward Auto Layout may also affect whether you want to use Storyboards. Using xibs you can enabled or disable Auto Layout is on a per .xib basis, allowing for a mix within your application, while Storyboards apply your choice to ALL views they contain.

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You see the big picture in one second. Having many NIB files, well, you don't see the big picture. Easier to maintain your programs. Easier to understand others programs... among others.

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