Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a sorted list of Strings that are directories, that I need to display as a tree.

For example, if I have these strings:

"folder a/folder b/file 1"
"folder a/folder b/file 2"
"folder a/folder c"

I need to display them as:

folder a
|- folder b
|  |- file 1
|  |- file 2
|- folder c

I'm currently thinking about going through the list and keeping track of "parent folder" (ie. "folder a/folder b" for the first string) and build the tree depending on if the "parent folder" is the same. This seems quite complicated in moving back through the parent folders and I was wondering if anyone could recommend an easier/more efficient way of doing this?

Would it help to iterate through the strings and actually build a tree first, and then iterate through the tree before displaying it? It might be worth noting that all data is saved as Strings (this tree would not be saved) therefore this requires me to build the tree data structure every time I want to display it.

share|improve this question
2  
are you trying to turn the list of strings into a tree data structure or are you trying to print out a tree representation of the list of strings. –  ggreiner Jan 31 '12 at 17:31
    
@ggreiner I'm trying to display it as a tree representation. –  dee Jan 31 '12 at 18:36
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you just want to print the tree, you can check this snippet. It outputs what you want.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collections;
import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.Map;

public class StringTree {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

    List<String> folders = new ArrayList<String>();
    folders.add("folder a/folder b/file 1");
    folders.add("folder a/folder b/file 2");
    folders.add("folder a/folder c");
    // for a non-lexically sorted folder list
    Collections.sort(folders);

    Map<Integer, String> map = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
    for (String path : folders) {
        String[] parsedPath = path.split("/");
        boolean newBranch = false;
        for (int i = 0; i < parsedPath.length; i++) {
        newBranch |= !parsedPath[i].equals(map.get(i));
        if (newBranch) {
            map.put(i, parsedPath[i]);
            print(i, parsedPath[i]);
        }
        }
    }
    }

    private static void print(int level, String item) {
    String tab = "";
    for (int i = 0; i < level; i++)
        tab = tab + ((i == 0) ? "| " : "|- ");
    System.out.println(tab + item);
    }

}

Update: Fixed bug with data:

folders.add("folder a/folder b/file 1");
folders.add("folder b/folder b/file 1");
share|improve this answer
    
There is something wrong here. Check with this data: folders.add("folder a/folder b/file 1"); folders.add("folder b/folder b/file 3"); folders.add("folder a/folder b/file 2"); folders.add("folder a/folder c"); folders.add("folder b/folder c"); folders.add("folder b/folder c"); folders.add("folder b/folder b/file 2"); folders.add("folder b/folder c"); folders.add("folder b/folder d"); Sry don't know how to format it beter in the comment. –  msi Jan 31 '12 at 18:06
1  
You have a folder b which contains a folder b, do you want that? The code assumes a sorted list of folders... You can sort them before printing, i'll insert the line. –  mtsz Jan 31 '12 at 18:11
    
Ok, I forget about sorting, my mistake. –  msi Jan 31 '12 at 18:18
1  
But still works wrong for: folders.add("folder a/folder b/file 1");folders.add("folder b/folder b/file 1"); –  msi Jan 31 '12 at 18:22
    
@msi Ok thanks for reviewing, I've fixed it now, hopefully :) –  mtsz Jan 31 '12 at 18:33
add comment

I have a tree implementation which can do it with a code as simple as this:

PathTreeBuilder.Funnel<String, String> urlFunnel = new PathTreeBuilder.Funnel<String, String>() {
    @Override
    public List<String> getPath(String value) {
        return Lists.newArrayList(value.split("/"));
    }
};
PathTreeBuilder<String, String> builder = new PathTreeBuilder<String, String>(urlFunnel);
List<Tree<String>> build = builder.build(urls);
build.toStringTree();

Hope it will be helpful to somebody.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Hope that helps. Builds entire structure of catalogs. Sry for short names and lack of generics. Hope it would be more readable.

public static void main(String[] args) {
    ArrayList<String> listOfPaths = new ArrayList<String>();
    listOfPaths.add("folder a/folder b/file 1");
    listOfPaths.add("folder a/folder b/file 2");
    listOfPaths.add("folder a/folder c");

    TreeMap structure = new TreeMap();
    for (String path : listOfPaths) {
        String[] tmp = path.split("/", 2); // [ "folder a/", "folder b/file 1"]  for first loops step
        put(structure, tmp[0], tmp[1]);
    }

    print(structure, "");
}
private static void put(TreeMap structure, String root, String rest) {
    String[] tmp = rest.split("/", 2);

    TreeMap rootDir = (TreeMap) structure.get(root);

    if (rootDir == null) {
        rootDir = new TreeMap();
        structure.put(root, rootDir);
    }
    if (tmp.length == 1) { // path end
        rootDir.put(tmp[0], null);
    } else {
        put(rootDir, tmp[0], tmp[1]);
    }
}
private static void print(TreeMap map, String delimeter) {
    if (map == null || map.isEmpty())
        return;
    for (Object m : map.entrySet()) {
        System.out.println(delimeter + "-" + ((Map.Entry)m).getKey());
        print((TreeMap)((Map.Entry)m).getValue(), " |" + delimeter);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 tested and works. –  mtsz Jan 31 '12 at 18:46
1  
Thanks! This works too but @mtsz answered slightly quicker than you so I accepted his/her answer and +1'd yours –  dee Jan 31 '12 at 19:11
add comment

I think a lot depends on what your final goal is. If it is just to print out the data, or if you need to process the data, or if you need to manipulate it algorithmically.

My gut instinct would be to do it all using LinkedHashMap and basically make it a map of a map of a map, etc... It can get a little tricky though to do this cleanly since you have two different possible values for your map - folder and file. Note that the use of the LinkedHashMap is to maintain the order of the data as you insert it. If you want it sorted, or random order, then you can choose other implementations.

Essentially, I would see it as something like the following (pseudo-code)

public interface DirectoryEntry{
  boolean isFile;
  boolean isFolder;
}

public class Folder implements DirectoryEntry{
    public boolean isFile(){ return false;}
    public boolean isFolder(){ return true;}

    private Map<String, DirectoryEntry> entries = new LinkedHashMap<String, DriectoyrEntry>();

    public Map<String, DirectoryEntry>getEntries(){ return entries;}
    public void addFile( String filename ){ entries.put( filename, new File();}
    public void addFolder( String foldername){entries.put(foldername, new Folder();}
}

public class File implements DirectoryEntry{
    public boolean isFile(){ return true;}
    public boolean isFolder(){ return false;}
 }

Then build the tree (you can do this recursively as well):

Map<String, DirectoryEntry> entries = new LinkedHashMap<String, DirectoryEntry>()

while( !end of list){
  Map entry = entries;

  1. Split string on '/'
  2. foreach( token ){
         if file
        entries.put( token, new File() );
         else{
        if( !entry.containsKey( token ) )
           entry.put(token, new Folder );

        // use the folder map for any sub-folders/files
        entry = ((Folder)entry.get( token )).getEntries();
         }
  }
}

Then you can scan through your final list and play with it as you like. I've created File and Folder intentionally basic, but you can add additional metadata/info there if you have/need.

Keep in mind that this is just an option to give you an idea as to how to parse/map the files/folders, but not meant as a functional solution as is.

As for if it is easier to parse first and print, like I said, it all depends what you hope to achieve with a final data set. But my gut instinct would be to parse it all and then display what you have parsed to ensure that what you are showing is what you have "understood" and will be manipulating.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Its better to build the tree first and then display since this can accomodate any changes later. You can create a Node object like

class Node{
  // level deep of this node, can use to format the display like
  // 4 level deep will have four leading spaces
  private int level;
  // the actual text
  private String text;
  // Parent Node for this, can be null if this is the root node, set this when creating
  private Node parent;
  // children of this Node
  private List<Node> children; 
  // Getters and setters for the above properties....
}
share|improve this answer
    
Downvote. Did you alteast go through the OP's question? –  Satadru Biswas Jan 31 '12 at 17:48
    
@SatadruBiswas :- did you read this part in the question "Would it help to iterate through the strings and actually build a tree first, and then iterate through the tree before displaying it?" My answer is given first, then there is the real concern "I was wondering if anyone could recommend an easier/more efficient way of doing this?" the code sample is for that. Can you find out the question on the OP's question ???? –  prajeesh kumar Jan 31 '12 at 17:52
    
Its better to build the tree first and then display since this can accomodate any changes later. You can create a Node object like. That is what the whole algorithm is supposed to be about..build the tree first i.e. convert a List<String> to a Tree which contains nodes. How does giving a description of how the node should looks like help here? –  Satadru Biswas Jan 31 '12 at 17:59
add comment

Basically, it all starts from a 'Root'. What you could do is:

while(!End of List)
{
    tempNode = Root;
    1. Resolve each line into tokens (with '/' as delimiter)
    2. while(hasMoreTokens())
       {
           3. Check if nextToken() is the child of tempNode
           4. If not, create node with nextToken(), continue till all tokens of line are exhausted.
           5. If yes, go to tempNode.nextToken(). Go to step 3.
       }
}

This way you create the tree every time you go through each line of the list.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.