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I have some troubles making this regexp:

I simply want the regexp test to fail if the input contains this symbol "<" directly followed by a letter, i.e something like: <[^a-zA-Z]

But I want it to work even if the "<" is not found. How can I do that?

EDIT: some examples

<Wrong example
Wrong <Example

Good Example
< Good Example
Good < Example
Good< Example
Good Example<

EDIT 2: When working with asp.net, you can't send a form with this text in an input for example:

<Previous

EDIT 3: This regular expression will be passed in a control that I cannot change, and it works by validating the input with a regular expression. Therefore I cannot match for the bad input

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Bring examples. Some valid and some invalid. –  Aliostad Jan 31 '12 at 17:38
    
What do you mean by "work"? And what do you mean by "work even if the <1 is not found"? The regular expression you supplied will match (succeed) if the source string contains a two character sequence consisting of the less-than symbol (<) followed by any single character other than an upper- or lower-case letter A-Z. It will not match (fail) if the source string does not contain that sequence. Exactly what are you trying to accomplish? –  Nicholas Carey Jan 31 '12 at 17:57
    
Let's say I have an html input on a form, and I don't want the user to write the less-than symbol followed by a character, because it will result in an error. The application server will crash as it will think it could be an attempt to compromise the security, like an attack by script –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 18:03
1  
@GianT971: Just so you know, the "correct answer" to this problem is not to use regex, but rather to HTML-escape anything you might display on a page (either as it is stored in the database or every time it is displayed). –  Platinum Azure Jan 31 '12 at 18:22
    
I wish I could upvote @Platinum Azure's comment more than once. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Jan 31 '12 at 18:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A negative lookahead regex on its own like

^(?!.*<[a-zA-Z])

would check that a letter never followed a left angle bracket, but an empty string would match your criteria. Do you also need to make sure it contains at least one alpha, like this?

^(?!.*<[a-zA-Z]).*[a-zA-Z]

In Perl:

while (<DATA>) {
  print if  /^(?!.*<[a-zA-Z])/;
}

__DATA__
<Wrong example
Wrong <Example
Good Example
< Good Example
Good < Example
Good< Example
Good Example<

OUTPUT

Good Example
< Good Example
Good < Example
Good< Example
Good Example<
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That's perfect, I will take a better look at this ability of the regular expressions, thank you –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 20:09

It would probably be simpler to match for the bad input and blacklist on it instead of matching on good input and whitelisting it.

Reject any input that matches the following regular expression:

<[a-zA-Z]

If you REALLY need a whitelisting solution (because you don't control the actual validation logic, only the regex), you could do this:

^(?:[^<]|<[^a-zA-Z]|<$)*$

(You can change the last Kleene star to a plus if you also want to make sure the input is nonempty.)

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Sorry I just saw your solution, it works too, many thanks –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 20:16

You can use [a-zA-Z]*(<[^a-zA-Z])?[a-zA-Z]*.

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Thanks, but actually my regex has to be exactly what I said, because I pass it to a program not written by me –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 17:46
    
Do you mean the regex must return no matches if there is a < followed by a letter? –  m4tt1mus Jan 31 '12 at 17:50
    
It will be used to validate an input, and I want to accept the input for everything except for a < followed directly by a letter –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 17:52
    
@GianT971 - Your regular expression will NOT match what you want it to match, the only way to do that, is to attempt to match it against the correct regular expression –  Ramhound Jan 31 '12 at 18:08
    
@Ramhound What about the "If Conditional" of regular expressions? I saw that on the web but I just don't understand it for the moment. For example: omegacoder.com/?p=56 –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 18:12

EDIT: Perhaps not the most ideal pattern, but it matches your "good" examples and does not match your "wrong" examples:

^((^|(<[^a-zA-Z]|[^<a-zA-Z])+)[a-zA-Z]+)+(<[^a-zA-Z]*|[^<a-zA-Z]*)$

I think you want to use parenthesis followed by a ? to indicate zero or one occurrences of that pattern:

(<[^a-zA-Z])?

I'm assuming that you are building a larger regex pattern, and is just a part of it.

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No, it will not work... –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 17:55
    
I am not building a large regex, it is the only condition I want to check –  GianT971 Jan 31 '12 at 17:57
1  
This won't work because it will trigger a large number of false positives and false negatives. It will check for zero or one valid cases (< followed by nonalpha), so if there are two valid cases this will result in a false negative, and if there is one valid case but also one invalid case (< followed by alpha) this will result in a false positive. –  Platinum Azure Jan 31 '12 at 18:13
    
Just out of curiosity, could you take a look at my alternative regex and let me know if I happened to miss the mark? I tried to keep it "simple" but I can totally imagine having screwed it up on my end. –  Platinum Azure Jan 31 '12 at 19:44
    
@PlatinumAzure - I was curious myself and gave it a try. According to my code, it only misses the "Good Example<" case. Still, there is surely a simpler regex than my monstrosity. –  Dr. Wily's Apprentice Jan 31 '12 at 21:23

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