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When I wrap "raw" resources in a C++ class, in destructor code I usually simply release the allocated resource(s), without paying attention to additional steps like zeroing out pointers, etc. e.g.:

class File
{
public:
  ...

  ~File()
  {
    if (m_file != NULL)
      fclose(m_file);
  }

private:
  FILE * m_file;
};

I wonder if this code style contains a potential bug: i.e. is it possible that a destructor is called more than once? In this case, the right thing to do in the destructor would be to clear pointers to avoid double/multiple destructions:

~File()
{
  if (m_file != NULL)
  {
    fclose(m_file);
    m_file = NULL; // avoid double destruction
  }
}

A similar example could be made for heap-allocated memory: if m_ptr is a pointer to memory allocated with new[], is the following destructor code OK?

// In destructor:
delete [] m_ptr; 

or should the pointer be cleared, too, to avoid double destruction?

// In destructor:
delete [] m_ptr;
m_ptr = NULL; // avoid double destruction
share|improve this question
    
The part of the question about setting the members to NULL, has been asked before. –  João Portela Jan 31 '12 at 17:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No. It is useful if you have a Close() function or the like:

void Close()
{
    if (m_file != NULL)
    {
        fclose(m_file);
        m_file = NULL;
    }
}
~File()
{
    Close();
}

This way, the Close() function is idempotent (you can call it as many times as you want), and you avoid one extra test in the destructor.

But since destructors in C++ can only be called once, assigning NULL to pointers there is pointless.

Unless, of course, for debuggin-purposes, particularly if you suspect a double-delete.

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Sure for the Close() method (I use the same pattern in case there is a Close() method). –  user1149224 Jan 31 '12 at 17:51
    
+1 Note an important detail: if in your application it does not make sense to close() before the object is destroyed (i.e. the lifetime of the object and the resource are the same), then close() should not be implemented (it allows for different lifetimes) and the handler should not be reset in the constructor. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 31 '12 at 18:16

If a destructor is called more than once, you already have undefined behavior. This will also not affect clients that may have a pointer to the resource themselves, so this is not preventing a double delete. A unique_ptr or scoped_ptr seem to be better solutions to me.

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I'm assuming the resource pointer is local to the class (no resource sharing). –  user1149224 Jan 31 '12 at 17:45
    
+1, beat me to it. –  João Portela Jan 31 '12 at 17:46

In a buggy application (for example, improper use of std::unique_ptr<> can result in two std::unique_ptr<> holding the same raw pointer), you can end up with a double delete, as the second one goes out of scope.

We care about these bad cases - otherwise, what's the point of discussing setting a pointer to nullptr in the destructor? It's going away anyways!

Hence, in this example, at least, it would be better to let the program seg-fault inside a debugger during a unit-test, so you can trace the real cause of the problem.

So, in general, I don't find setting pointers to nullptr to be particularly useful for memory management.

You could do it, but a more robust alternative is to do unit tests and to judiciously use a memory checker like valgrind.

After all, with some memory errors, your program can seemingly run ok many times, until it crashes unexpectedly - much safer to do quality assurance with a memory checker, especially as your program gets larger, and memory errors become less obvious.

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2  
I always NULL out pointers so that if I mess up and reference an object after it's destroyed, I am more likely to get a segfault than silent failure. Interesting that we do opposite things for exactly the same reasons. –  Mooing Duck Jan 31 '12 at 18:20
    
@MooingDuck +1 good point! –  kfmfe04 Jan 31 '12 at 18:26
    
And there are a lot of cases where valgrind is not an option. –  rodrigo Jan 31 '12 at 21:21

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