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I'm trying to construct an Array in bash-shell of the filenames from my camera:

FILES=(2011-09-04 21.43.02.jpg
2011-09-05 10.23.14.jpg
2011-09-09 12.31.16.jpg
2011-09-11 08.43.12.jpg)

As you can see, there is a space in the middle of each filename.
I've tried wrapping each name in quotes, and escaping the space with a backslash, neither of which works.

When I try to access the array elements, it continues to treat the space as the element-delimiter.

How can I properly capture the filenames with a space inside the name?

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Have you tried adding the files the old-fashioned way? Like FILES[0] = ...? (Edit: I just did; doesn't work. Interesting). –  Dan Fego Jan 31 '12 at 17:43

5 Answers 5

up vote 32 down vote accepted

I think the issue might be partly with how you're accessing the elements. If I do a simple for elem in $FILES, I experience the same issue as you. However, if I access the array through its indices, like so, it works if I add the elements either numerically or with escapes:

for ((i = 0; i < ${#FILES[@]}; i++))
do
    echo "${FILES[$i]}"
done

Any of these declarations of $FILES should work:

FILES=(2011-09-04\ 21.43.02.jpg
2011-09-05\ 10.23.14.jpg
2011-09-09\ 12.31.16.jpg
2011-09-11\ 08.43.12.jpg)

or

FILES=("2011-09-04 21.43.02.jpg"
"2011-09-05 10.23.14.jpg"
"2011-09-09 12.31.16.jpg"
"2011-09-11 08.43.12.jpg")

or

FILES[0]="2011-09-04 21.43.02.jpg"
FILES[1]="2011-09-05 10.23.14.jpg"
FILES[2]="2011-09-09 12.31.16.jpg"
FILES[3]="2011-09-11 08.43.12.jpg"
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2  
Note that you should use double-quotes when you use the array elements (e.g. echo "${FILES[$i]}"). It doesn't matter for echo, but it will for anything that uses it as a filename. –  Gordon Davisson Jan 31 '12 at 19:35
2  
It's not necessary to loop over the indexes when you can loop over the elements with for f in "${FILES[@]}". –  Mark Edgar Feb 1 '12 at 2:44

There must be something wrong with the way you access the array's items. Here's how it's done:

for elem in "${files[@]}"
...

From the bash manpage:

Any element of an array may be referenced using ${name[subscript]}. ... If subscript is @ or *, the word expands to all members of name. These subscripts differ only when the word appears within double quotes. If the word is double-quoted, ${name[*]} expands to a single word with the value of each array member separated by the first character of the IFS special variable, and ${name[@]} expands each element of name to a separate word.

Of course, you should also use double quotes when accessing a single member

cp "${files[0]}" /tmp
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Cleanest, most elegant solution in this bunch, though should re-iterate that each element defined in the array should be quoted. –  maverick Oct 24 '12 at 4:01
    
Those quotes, of course, this solves everything. –  basicdays Apr 8 '14 at 3:45

You need to use IFS to stop space as element delimiter.

FILES=("2011-09-04 21.43.02.jpg"
       "2011-09-05 10.23.14.jpg"
       "2011-09-09 12.31.16.jpg"
       "2011-09-11 08.43.12.jpg")
IFS=""
for jpg in ${FILES[*]}
do
    echo "${jpg}"
done

If you want to separate on basis of . then just do IFS="." Hope it helps you:)

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This is what worked for me. (note: using zsh). –  duma Jan 31 '14 at 15:15
    
I had to move the IFS="" to before the array assignment but this is the correct answer. –  rob Apr 2 at 7:52

I agree with others that it's likely how you're accessing the elements that is the problem. Quoting the file names in the array assignment is correct:

FILES=(
  "2011-09-04 21.43.02.jpg"
  "2011-09-05 10.23.14.jpg"
  "2011-09-09 12.31.16.jpg"
  "2011-09-11 08.43.12.jpg"
)

for f in "${FILES[@]}"
do
  echo "$f"
done

Using double quotes around any array of the form "${FILES[@]}" splits the array into one word per array element. It doesn't do any word-splitting beyond that.

Using "${FILES[*]}" also has a special meaning, but it joins the array elements with the first character of $IFS, resulting in one word, which is probably not what you want.

Using a bare ${array[@]} or ${array[*]} subjects the result of that expansion to further word-splitting, so you'll end up with words split on spaces (and anything else in $IFS) instead of one word per array element.

Using a C-style for loop is also fine and avoids worrying about word-splitting if you're not clear on it:

for (( i = 0; i < ${#FILES[@]}; i++ ))
do
  echo "${FILES[$i]}"
done
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Escaping works.

#!/bin/bash

FILES=(2011-09-04\ 21.43.02.jpg
2011-09-05\ 10.23.14.jpg
2011-09-09\ 12.31.16.jpg
2011-09-11\ 08.43.12.jpg)

echo ${FILES[0]}
echo ${FILES[1]}
echo ${FILES[2]}
echo ${FILES[3]}

Output:

$ ./test.sh
2011-09-04 21.43.02.jpg
2011-09-05 10.23.14.jpg
2011-09-09 12.31.16.jpg
2011-09-11 08.43.12.jpg

Quoting the strings also produces the same output.

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