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Edit It looks like creating a table that holds the DateTimes by minutes to join against would make the most sense. 100 years worth of minutes is ~52M rows. Indexed by the Ticks should make the query run pretty fast. It now becomes

Thanks for the feedback everyone!

I have a class called Recurrence that looks like this:

public class Recurrence
{
    public int Id { get; protected set; }
    public DateTime StartDate { get; protected set; }
    public DateTime? EndDate { get; protected set; }
    public long? RecurrenceInterval { get; protected set; }

}

It is an entity framework POCO class. There are two things I want to do with this class all with standard query operators. (So that the query runs entirely server side).

First I want to create a query that returns all the dates from the start date to the end date inclusive with the given recurrence interval. The iterative function is simple

for(i=StartDate.Ticks; i<=EndDate.Ticks; i+=RecurrenceInterval)
{
  yield return new DateTime(i);
}

Enumerable.Range() would be an option but there is no long version of Range. I'm thinking my only option here is Aggregate but I'm still not very strong with that function.

Finally once I have that query working, I want to return the values from there that are within a time window i.e. between a different start and end date. That is easy enough to do using SkipWhile/TakeWhile.

Here's how I could do it if DateTime.Ticks was an int

from recurrence in Recurrences
let range =
Enumerable
  .Range(
    (int)recurrence.StartDate.Ticks,
    recurrence.EndDate.HasValue ? (int)recurrence.EndDate.Value.Ticks : (int)end.Ticks)
  .Where(i=>i-(int)recurrence.StartDate.Ticks%(int)recurrence.RecurrenceLength.Value==0)
  .SkipWhile(d => d < start.Ticks)
  .TakeWhile(d => d <= end.Ticks)
from date in range
select new ScheduledEvent { Date = new DateTime(date) };

I guess what I need is an implementation of LongRange that could execute over an EF Query.

share|improve this question
    
It would seem more appropriate to return dates on a daily/hourly basis rather than for every tick. How do you need to use this? –  Magnus Jan 31 '12 at 17:53
1  
I figure that even if you could get what you want, you'll be back to ask how to improve the performance of it. When the first step is easy and the second step is defeatingly difficult, it might mean the first step was on the wrong path. –  David B Jan 31 '12 at 17:58
    
You should consider using an existing library for Recurrence's such as Quartz.NET or iCalendar –  Magnus Jan 31 '12 at 18:00
    
@DavidB as a sql query this would be very performant already. –  Mike Brown Jan 31 '12 at 18:16
    
@Magnus the duration would vary between days, hours, even years. Sadly the client will not approve usage of Quartz wasn't aware of iCal but that'll probably be a no go as well. Also, they don't want events so much as we want to see when the events would occur within a given range of dates. –  Mike Brown Jan 31 '12 at 18:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the function that yields the intersection of the Recurrence points and a specified subinterval:

public class Recurrence
{
    public int Id { get; protected set; }
    public DateTime StartDate { get; protected set; }
    public DateTime? EndDate { get; protected set; }
    public long? RecurrenceInterval { get; protected set; }

    // returns the set of DateTimes within [subStart, subEnd] that are
    // of the form StartDate + k*RecurrenceInterval, where k is an Integer
    public IEnumerable<DateTime> GetBetween(DateTime subStart, DateTime subEnd)
    {            
        long stride = RecurrenceInterval ?? 1;
        if (stride < 1) 
            throw new ArgumentException("Need a positive recurrence stride");

        long realStart, realEnd;

        // figure out where we really need to start
        if (StartDate >= subStart)
            realStart = StartDate.Ticks;
        else
        {
            long rem = subStart.Ticks % stride;
            if (rem == 0)
                realStart = subStart.Ticks;
            else
                // break off the incomplete stride and add a full one
                realStart = subStart.Ticks - rem + stride;
        }
        // figure out where we really need to stop
        if (EndDate <= subEnd)
            // we know EndDate has a value. Null can't be "less than" something
            realEnd = EndDate.Value.Ticks; 
        else
        {
            long rem = subEnd.Ticks % stride;
            // break off any incomplete stride
            realEnd = subEnd.Ticks - rem;
        }
        if (realEnd < realStart)
            yield break; // the intersection is empty

        // now yield all the results in the intersection of the sets
        for (long t = realStart; t <= realEnd; t += stride)
            yield return new DateTime(t);
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
For clarification, when the answer to "Is long? A < long B" is TRUE, it means that A has a value. If it didn't, you'd get FALSE for all greater/less than/equal comparisons with B. –  CodeGnome Jan 31 '12 at 19:03
    
Combining your algorithm with Olivier's guards against edge cases. –  Mike Brown Jan 31 '12 at 19:36
    
Both very good answers. This is the more thourough algorithm though thanks! –  Mike Brown Feb 2 '12 at 19:30

You could create your own date range method

public static class EnumerableEx
{
    public static IEnumerable<DateTime> DateRange(DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate, TimeSpan intervall)
    {
        for (DateTime d = startDate; d <= endDate; d += intervall) {
            yield return d;
        }
    }
}

Then query with

var query =
    from recurrence in Recurrences
    from date in EnumerableEx.DateRange(recurrence.StartDate,
                                        recurrence.EndDate ?? end,
                                        recurrence.RecurrenceInterval)
    select new ScheduledEvent { Date = date };

This assumes that RecurrenceInterval is declared as TimeSpan and end as DateTime.


EDIT: Would this version restrict the recurrences on the server side as you excpect?

var query =
    from recurrence in Recurrences
    where
        recurrence.StartDate <= end &&
        (recurrence.EndDate != null && recurrence.EndDate.Value >= start ||
         recurrence.EndDate == null)
    from date in EnumerableEx.DateRange(
        recurrence.StartDate,
        recurrence.EndDate.HasValue && recurrence.EndDate.Value < end ? recurrence.EndDate.Value : end,
        recurrence.RecurrenceInterval)
    where (date >= start)
    select new ScheduledEvent { Date = date };

Here the returned recurrences already take in account the start and the end date, thus not returning obsolete recurrences. EnumerableEx.DateRange has no effect on the first part of the query.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with that being that it doesn't get transformed by the Query Provider...and runs client side. –  Mike Brown Jan 31 '12 at 18:27
    
I added a version which should be transformed by the query provider as it uses only normal comparisons in the where clause and uses no date range enumeration here. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 31 '12 at 19:25
    
I see what you're saying. Once we limit the range, selecting client side should be trivial. Like I said, it works for intervals greater than a day. Most of the time the window will be for a week as well. Following YAGNI, we'll revisit the algorithm if performance becomes a problem. –  Mike Brown Jan 31 '12 at 19:26
2  
A query to EF will eventually be transformed to an SQL statement. You cannot expect more of this SQL statement than containing an appropriate WHERE clause. Every supplemental logic has to be performed on the returned records (mapped to Recurrence). The only thing the (db) server can do, is to execute a query. –  Olivier Jacot-Descombes Jan 31 '12 at 19:31
    
Had to break the query into two parts. Otherwise EF complains that it can't translate DateRange to a corresponding store function. –  Mike Brown Jan 31 '12 at 19:33

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