Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have a SqlAlchemy model something like this:

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy import Column, String, Integer, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker, relationship
Base = declarative_base()
Session = sessionmaker()

class EmployeeType(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'employee_type'
    id = Column(Integer(), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(20))

class Employee(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'employee'
    id = Column(Integer(), primary_key=True)
    type_id = Column(Integer(), ForeignKey(EmployeeType.id))
    type = relationship(EmployeeType, uselist=False)

session = Session()
session.add(EmployeeType(name='drone'))
session.add(EmployeeType(name='PHB'))

I'd like to have some kind of "relationship" from Employee directly to EmployeeType.name as a convenience, so I can skip the step of looking up an id or EmployeeType object if I have a type name:

emp = Employee()
emp.type_name = "drone"
session.add(emp)
session.commit()
assert (emp.type.id == 1)

Is such a thing possible?

EDIT: I found that association_proxy can get me partway there:

class Employee(Base):
    ...
    type_name = association_proxy("type", "name")

the only problem being that if I assign to it:

emp = session.query(Employee).filter_by(EmployeeType.name=='PHB').first()
emp.type_name = 'drone'

it modifies the employee_type.name column, not the employee.type_id column.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with Jonathan's general approach, but I feel like adding an employee object to the session and setting the employee type should be independent operations. Here's an implementation that has type_name as a property and requires adding to the session before setting it:

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base
from sqlalchemy import Column, String, Integer, ForeignKey
from sqlalchemy.orm import sessionmaker, relationship
Base = declarative_base()
Session = sessionmaker()

class EmployeeType(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'employee_type'
    id = Column(Integer(), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(20))

class Employee(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'employee'
    id = Column(Integer(), primary_key=True)
    type_id = Column(Integer(), ForeignKey(EmployeeType.id))
    type = relationship(EmployeeType)

    @property
    def type_name(self):
        if self.type is not None:
            return self.type.name
        return None

    @type_name.setter
    def type_name(self, value):
        if value is None:
            self.type = None
        else:
            session = Session.object_session(self)
            if session is None:
                raise Exception("Can't set Employee type by name until added to session")
            self.type = session.query(EmployeeType).filter_by(name=value).one()
share|improve this answer
    
As an exercise, I also whipped up a version that allows setting type_name before attaching Employee to a session, by attaching an "after_attach" event listener to Session: gist.github.com/1750520 –  Mu Mind Feb 6 '12 at 7:47

I would do this by creating a method that does this for me.

class EmployeeType(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'employee_type'
    id = Column(Integer(), primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(20))

class Employee(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'employee'
    id = Column(Integer(), primary_key=True)
    type_id = Column(Integer(), ForeignKey(EmployeeType.id))
    type = relationship(EmployeeType, uselist=False)

    def __init__(self, type):
        self.type = type

    def add(self, type_name=None):
        if type_name is not None:
            emp_type = DBSession.query(EmployeeType).filter(EmployeeType.name == type_name).first()
            if emp_type:
                type = emp_type
            else:
                type = EmployeeType(name=type_name)
        else:
            type = None
        DBSession.add(Employee(type=type))

Then you do:

Employee.add(type_name='boss')
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.