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I have a project in C and I have to scan an array[10][15] diagonally as in the picture below.

enter image description here

I would like to help me to find how to scan the array this way... Thank you very much.

P.S sorry for my english(I'm Greek)

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2  
Could not understand your image. Diagonally or around the sides along the left and then the bottom. –  phoxis Jan 31 '12 at 18:57
    
scanf has nothing to do with 'scanning arrays'. –  Michael Burr Jan 31 '12 at 18:57
    
Something like add or subtract 1 to the x and y offset of the 2d matrix array and if those values are in bounds, grab the value? –  Michael Dorgan Jan 31 '12 at 19:06
    
diagonally as the arrows show. –  user963395 Jan 31 '12 at 19:07
    
What exactly is your question? –  Pablo Maurin Jan 31 '12 at 19:09

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Notice that along each diagonal, the difference* i - j is constant. So you have a nested double loop, where the outer one goes over the difference:

  • First round: Difference -14, arr[0][14]

  • Second round: Difference -13, arr[0][13], arr[1][14]

  • ...

  • last round: Difference +9, arr[9][0].

In code:

for (int d = -14; d < 10; ++d)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < d + 15 && i < 10; ++i)
    {
      if (i < d) continue;

      // access arr[i][i - d];
      printf("[%d, %d]\n", i, i - d);
    }
}

Note the appearance of the numbers 10 and 15 in the code; the picture is readily generalized to arbitrary array bounds.

*) Or, as @Alexey points out, the sum i + j is constant, depending on where the origin is in your picture; in that case, modify the loop as follows:

for (int d = 0; d <= 9 + 14; ++d)
{
    for (int i = 0; i <= d && i < 10; ++i)
    {
        if (i + 15 <= d) continue;
        // use arr[i][d - i];
    }
}
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I would upvote for the idea, but: the result is [0, 14] [0, 13] [1, 14] [0, 12] [1, 13] [2, 14] etc while it should (I think) be [0,0] [1,0] [0,1] [2,0] [1,1] [0,2] etc. –  Alexey Kukanov Jan 31 '12 at 19:25
    
@AlexeyKukanov: That's not what the question asks. You are describing antidiagonals, but the picture clearly asks for diagonals. Either way, the modification is trivial. –  Kerrek SB Jan 31 '12 at 19:26
    
Instead of i = 0 and check if its < d each iteration, you can do "for (int i = d > 0 ? d : 0; ..." (of course, you can compute the starting i before the loop, to make the code more legible, but I think you got the point). –  fbafelipe Jan 31 '12 at 19:28
    
@fbafelipe: I don't think your code is correct, but in any event I'd probably just leave the hoisting to the compiler, which should spot this and optimize accordingly; as it stands the loop condition is fairly readable. You can of course stick a manual min(d + 15, 10) in there if you like, why not. –  Kerrek SB Jan 31 '12 at 19:32
    
Well, the directions in which array indices increase are not specified in the question, so at least two different interpretations are possible. You took the direction as for Euclidean coordinates, and I took the one that is typically used for matrices. Perhaps it's just subjective interpretation; +1 then :) –  Alexey Kukanov Jan 31 '12 at 19:39

Here's my 2 bits:

void scan_array(int* data, int height, int width, void (*handler)(int)) {
    int startY = 0;
    for (; startY < height; startY ++) {
    int ypos = startY;
    int xpos = 0;
    while (ypos >= 0 && xpos < width) {
        handler(*(data + ypos * width + xpos));
        ypos--;
        xpos++;
    }
    }

    int startX = 1;
    for (; startX < width; startX ++) {
    int xpos = startX;
    int ypos = height - 1;
    while (ypos >= 0 && xpos < width) {
        handler(*(data + ypos * width + xpos));
        ypos--;
        xpos++;
    }
    }
}

void print_elem(int elem) {
    printf("%d ", elem);
}

int main(void) {
    int data[2][3] = { {1, 2, 3}, {10, 20, 30} };
    scan_array(&data[0][0], 2, 3, print_elem);
    printf("\n========\n");

    int data2[3][2] = { {1, 2},  {10, 20}, {100, 200} };
    scan_array(&data2[0][0], 3, 2, print_elem);
    printf("\n========\n");

    int square[2][2] = { {1, 2},  {10, 20}};
    scan_array(&square[0][0], 2, 2, print_elem);
    printf("\n========\n");
}
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int i, j;

// left arrows
for(i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    for(j = 0; j <= i && j < columns; j++)
        doSomethingWithCell(grid[i][j]);

// bottom arrows
for(int i = 0; i < columns; i++)
    for(int j = rows - 1; j >= 0; j--)
        doSomethingWithCell(grid[j][i]);
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I'm going to assume you are labeling it with the upper left most cell as 0,0 and the lower right most cell as 10,15. And doSomething is whatever you are doing in this scanning.

//First all the ones starting in col=0
for (rowStart=0; rowStart<numRows ; rowStart++){
    colStart=0; //Start on the left boundary
    rowOffset=colOffset=0;
    while (rowStart+rowOffset > 0 && colStart+colOffset<numCols){
      doSomething(array[rowStart+rowOffset][colStart+colOffset]);
      colOffset++; rowOffset--; // Move one space to the right and one space up
    }
//Second all the diagonals starting in the maxRow
for (colStart=0; colStart<numCols ; numCol++){
    rowStart=numRows-1; //Start at the bottom
    rowOffset=colOffset=0;
    while (rowStart+rowOffset > 0 && colStart+colOffset<numCols){
      doSomething(array[rowStart+rowOffset][colStart+colOffset]);
      colOffset++; rowOffset--; // Move one space to the right and one space up
    }    

}
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You can scan every 14 elements instead of 15. This way you get the diagonal.

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I am assuming I understand your question, which I read as: I want to draw a diagonal line through an array and visit each cell that the line crosses.

Use the Bresenham Algorithm to find out which cells to visit in your array and then return an array composed of the cells that Bresenham found for you. If you read the wikipedia article I linked, you'll see functions called plot and setPixel. The input to those functions are the cells you should be reading from.

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I believe you are looking for something like this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    const int ROWS = 10;
    const int COLS = 15;

    int array[ROWS][COLS];

    int i, j;

    // left arrows
    for (i = 0; i < ROWS; ++i) {
        for (j = 0; j <= i && j < COLS; ++j) {
            scanf("%d", &array[i - j][j]);
        }
    }

    // bottom arrows
    for (j = 1; j < COLS; ++j) {
        for (i = 0; i < ROWS && j + i < COLS; ++i) {
            scanf("%d", &array[ROWS - i - 1][j + i]);
        }
    }

    // dump to a file, just for testing
    FILE *fp = fopen("test.txt", "w");

    for (i = 0; i < ROWS; ++i) {
        for (j = 0; j < COLS; ++j) {
            fprintf(fp, "%d ", array[i][j]);
        }
        fputc('\n', fp);
    }

    fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}
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