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Maybe someone could explain the difference between property:

in .h file

@property(nonatomic,retain) NSString *someString;
@property(nonatomic,retain) NSString *someString2;

in .m file

@synthesize someString = _someString;

or

@synthesize someString2;

what is the difference for _someString and self.someString2 using in controller? and in dealloc how i should release these property's

[_someString release];

AND

[self.someString2 release];

OR

_someString = nil;
_someString2 = nil;
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How did appear _someString2 here? –  beryllium Jan 31 '12 at 19:20

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

After:

property(nonatomic,retain) NSString *someString;
property(nonatomic,retain) NSString *someString2;

and:

@synthesize someString = _someString;
@synthesize someString2;

someString is a property backed by the instance variable _someString. Memory retention and release is managed by Obj-C.

  • Assignments to someString should use the form self.someString within the class, and must use <reference>.someString outside of it. Except within an initializer there should never be any assignments to a plain _someString.
  • Reading the value can use simply _someString within the class, but self.someString is also valid, and must use <reference>.someString outside of it.
  • Releasing the value must use the form self.someString = nil within the class, and <reference>.someString = nil outside of it.

someString2 is similar except it is backed by an automatically named instance variable, which happens to be called someString2.

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synthesize someString = _someString;

This says synthesize the property someString but for direct access, use _somestring.

synthesize someString2;

This says synthesize the property someString2 but for direct access, use someString2.

Think of it as if the compiler is generating the iVars for you but in the first case the iVar is called _someString and the second is called someString2

This is a common usage (I recently moved to it) so that when you are dealing with the object directly (such as initialisers or in dealloc, where you should't use self) you can see instantly that when you write _someString = @"aString"; you are not going through the property methods that would apply the memory management types (such as retain, or copy). It used to be common that people would assign values directly, and then wonder why they weren't being retained.

[_someString release];
[_someString2 release];

Is sending the release method directly to the object.

self.someString = nil;
self.someString2 = nil;

Sends release through the property. In this case, There is no difference. There would be a difference if you were allocating objects: for example:

_someString = someOtherString;

Is a leak (except under ARC, which I will come to later), because you are just putting in a new object to the store, without releasing the current object.

self.someString = someOtherString;

does not leak anything, because the sythesized setter will release the current object before setting (and retaining) the new object.

I said I'd come to ARC. In which case you can't call release anyway, so the questions don't arise, but _someString = someOtherString is not a leak, because the compiler will deal with releasing the current object for you.

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very informative, thanks –  Justin Amberson Jan 31 '12 at 21:21

@synthesize someString = _someString; Means you're making a property with a different name then the member variable it's associated with. This is fine. Typically they are same name. Here's an example when that isn't the case. So someString would be your property and _someString is your member variable.

As for [_someString release]; and [self.someString2 release]; what you're seeing is release being called on the member variable of your class(Which is _someString). [self.someString2 release] calls release on whatever the property returns. Keep in mind that properties can do more then just simply get and set. They are methods just like any other you might right.

Also, don't do [self.someString2 release]; Instead do self.someString2 = nil; That will release it on your behalf. That way it nils out the string. That will protect you from accessing bad memory incase the string is actually deallocated.

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_someString = nil won't release your property.

In this case _someString and self._someString point to the exact same object, so you can release using either.

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it's not recommended, however, to release the property getter! Like [self.someString release] may be incorrect! (the compiler can generate autorelease getters, so that's a bad practice!) –  user529758 Jan 31 '12 at 19:16
[_someString release];

AND

[self.someString2 release];

releases twice, that's wrong. Use

_someString = nil;
_someString2 = nil;

simply sets your ivars to nil, it doesn't release them, so that's again wrong.

Correct: either

self.someString = nil;
self.someString2 = nil;

or

[_someString release];
[_someString2 release];

I'd recommend the first one (dot-notation), as it does the right thing (you don't know what kind of code does a compiler generate when synthesizing your accessors...)

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