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I'm new to Java, so bear with me if I say anything stupid! I'm having a few problems, which I think are Unicode-related.

I'm using Scanner to read in tokenised commands from a text file, saved with UTF-8 encoding. Basically I want to first check that the command isn't equal to either "command1" or "command2" (I do something else in these cases), then otherwise read in a character. If the token isn't a single character, I'm going to output an error.

Here's my code:

public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException {
    Scanner scanner = new Scanner(new File(args[0]));
    while (scanner.hasNext()) {
        String command = scanner.next();
        if (command.equals("command1")) {
            System.out.println("command: command1");
            // do something
        } else if (command.equals("command2")) {
            System.out.println("command: command2");
            // do something
        } else {
            if (command.length() == 1) {
                char c = command.charAt(0);
                System.out.println("character: " + c);
                // do something with c
            } else {
                System.err.println("error (string was " + command
                        + " with length " + command.length() + ")");
            }
        }
    }
}

And the contents of the text file whose filename I'm passing in args[0] for testing:

command1
x
y
command2
z
└
command1
╒
═

Expected output is:

command: command1
character: x
character: y
command: command2
character: z
character: └
command: command1
character: ╒
character:  ═

Actual output is:

command: command1
character: x
character: y
command: command2
character: z
error (string was └ with length 3)
command: command1
error (string was ╒ with length 3)
error (string was ═ with length 3)

As you can see, the non-standard characters are being seen as a 3-character string by Java. Strangely, if I copy/paste the one of the characters from the terminal output into a System.out.println("└".length()) statement, it correctly prints 1.

Any ideas on where I'm going wrong?
Thanks

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"If the token isn't a single character, I'm going to output an error." Note that the length() method on String return the number of UTF-16 code units, not the number of characters. These are often but not always the same. –  bames53 Jan 31 '12 at 19:55
    
@bames53 Thanks for pointing that out. Is there a better way of testing for whether or not a String is a single character, or is this just a potential gotcha to watch out for? –  chigley Jan 31 '12 at 20:07
    
it depends on what you mean by 'single character'. If a sensible definition for your use case is that a code point is a character, then you only have to watch out for surrogate pairs. If you need a definition that allows for things like combining characters then at the very least you'll probably want a library that knows all about Unicode properties and whatnot. -- Dealing with Unicode text is complicated. Honestly, a lot of software out there gets it wrong but still manages to be useful. So you might want to learn a bit about it, but may decide it's not worth the effort to implement. –  bames53 Jan 31 '12 at 20:55
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you open files in Java, the encoding (if you don't specify one) is taken from the file.encoding system property. This is almost never set to something that you want (if you're like me, you always want UTF-8).

To fix, explicitly specify your character set when you create your Scanner:

Scanner scanner = new Scanner(new File(args[0]), "UTF-8");
share|improve this answer
    
Brilliant, thanks! –  chigley Jan 31 '12 at 19:37
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I suspect your problem comes indeed from an encoding mismatch. Have you tried passing a Charset in the Scanner's constructor ?

Your code works perfectly on my system (Arch Linux 64b, java 6.0.30), with a default locale in UTF-8. If you run Windows, your locale may be Win-CP1252, which could be used by the Scanner.

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