Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a code that looks like this:

int main () {
  fstream file;
  file.open("test.bin", ios::out | ios::binary);
  if(!file.is_open())
  {
      return -1;
  }
  int n = 3;
  file.write(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&n), sizeof(n));
  file.close();
  return 0;
}

when I run it alone, it exits with -1, so obviously it failed to open "test.bin". However, if I save a blank notepad file as "test.bin", and run it, it works fine. What I am wondering is how I can get my C++ program to automatically generate an empty file "test.bin" if a file called "test.bin" does not already exist.

share|improve this question
1  
Try again. Since you changed that ios::in to an ios::out, it works just fine. –  paxdiablo May 26 '09 at 1:53
    
It has nothing to do with the file.write, because the program reaches return -1 before file.write and the problem is that it isn't opening test.bin at all, causing the program to end before it gets to file.write. –  user98188 May 26 '09 at 1:56
    
That program, as it is, works fine under my VS2008 so you may want to look into whether or not the file already exists, what its permissions are, which directory you're trying to create it in and so on. The code is fine. It creates the bin file then writes the integer 3. What is the rdstate() on failure? –  paxdiablo May 26 '09 at 2:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code snippet is wrong since it's trying to write to a file that you've opened for input. If you want to write to the file, simply use ios::out instead of ios::in.

If you want to open the file for reading but create it if it does not exist, you can use:

file.open("test.bin", ios::in | ios::binary);
if(!file.is_open()) {
    file.open("test.bin", ios::out | ios::binary);
    int n = 3;
    file.write(reinterpret_cast<char*>(&n), sizeof(n));
    file.close();
    file.open("test.bin", ios::in | ios::binary);
    if(!file.is_open()) {
        return -1;
    }
}

This will initialize the file with the integer 3 as the default contents, if it doesn't already exist.

If it does exist, it will leave the contents alone. In either case, you'll have the file open at the first byte.

share|improve this answer

I'd assume you could probably just do it by opening and closing a file:

if (GetFileAttributes("test.bin") == INVALID_FILE_ATTRIBUTES)
{
    fstream file;
    file.open("test.bin", ios::out);
    file.close();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yep, this creates an empty test.bin. +1. –  RedBlueThing May 26 '09 at 1:31
1  
Probably worth noting that GetFileAttributes is Windows specific (which is fine for the OP, but future arrivals might care). –  dmckee May 26 '09 at 1:45
    
Use stat (2) on a POSIX system. –  dmckee May 26 '09 at 1:47
    
Why do you think it's fine for the OP? The tags don't indicate MSVC. Notepad indicates Windows but MSVC isn't the only compiler for that platform nor is Win32 API necessarily available. @Keand64, please retag/indicate if you want Win32 solutions, otherwise we should stick to the standard. –  paxdiablo May 26 '09 at 1:51

One option is to open for read/write and seek to the beginning of the file.

Then, you may read, write, or do whatever you wish.

share|improve this answer
    
ios:app will force all writes to the end of the file. –  paxdiablo May 26 '09 at 2:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.