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I am using Entity Framework 4.0 (so I can use it with .NET 3.5) and I generated a DAL from an existing database.

In the database I have two tables with the following columns (Nothing is allowed to be NULL):

  1. tblWeapon (WeaponId PK, WeaponLabel)
  2. tblShot (ShotId PK, WeaponId)

And there's a foreign key on tblShot's WeaponId to tblWeapon.

Then the generated entities look something like this:

public class Weapon {
    public int WeaponId { ... }
    public string WeaponLabel { ...}
    public EntityCollection Shots { ... }
}

public class Shot {
    public int ShotId { ... }
    public EntityReference WeaponReference { ... }
    public Weapon Weapon { ... }
}

In my code I have a ShotFilter and a WeaponFilter classes that contain criteria to filter the individual tables by. Since the filter for the entities is dynamically generated, I would like to spread generation of the queries to the respective filter classes. Each filter would return an IQueryable<T> and they would be joined as needed to achieve the desired results.

What I want to do is get all the Shot objects that reference a weapon where the label contains the text 0.5.

The problem comes when trying to do an inner join on the IQueryable<Shot> to the IQueryable<Weapon> since Shot doesn't contain a WeaponId field (just a WeaponReference). After scouring the web and not finding much of anything, I found a forum post where the answer was to just join on the objects themselves. So I tried this and got the results I was expecting:

var oWeaponQuery = from w in oDc.Weapons select w;
oWeaponQuery = oWeaponQuery.Where(w => w.Label.Contains("0.5"));

var oShotQuery = from s in oDc.Shots select s;
oShotQuery = oShotQuery.Join(oWeaponQuery, s => s.Weapon, w => w, (s, w) => s);

But when I inspected the actual SQL queried using SQL Server Profiler, I saw this awful statement (and vomited a little):

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[Extent1].[ShotId] AS [ShotId], 
[Extent1].[WeaponId] AS [WeaponId]
FROM  [dbo].[tblShot] AS [Extent1]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[tblWeapon] AS [Extent2] ON  EXISTS (SELECT 
    cast(1 as bit) AS [C1]
        FROM    ( SELECT cast(1 as bit) AS X ) AS [SingleRowTable1]
        LEFT OUTER JOIN  (SELECT 
            [Extent3].[WeaponId] AS [WeaponId]
            FROM [dbo].[tblWeapon] AS [Extent3]
            WHERE [Extent1].[WeaponId] = [Extent3].[WeaponId] ) AS [Project1] ON 1 = 1
        LEFT OUTER JOIN  (SELECT 
            [Extent4].[WeaponId] AS [WeaponId]
            FROM [dbo].[tblWeapon] AS [Extent4]
            WHERE [Extent1].[WeaponId] = [Extent4].[WeaponId] ) AS [Project2] ON 1 = 1
        WHERE ([Project1].[WeaponId] = [Extent2].[WeaponId]) OR (([Project2].[WeaponId] IS NULL) AND ([Extent2].[WeaponId] IS NULL))
    )
WHERE (CAST(CHARINDEX(N'0.5', [Extent2].[Label]) AS int)) > 0

So, how would I do this in the correct or at least efficient manner? Or any other suggestions on how to organize my query generation in a dynamic and distributed manner?

Thanks!


Update With More Details

Part of my issue in doing the join is with EF, in the generated entity for Shot there is no WeaponId property. There's just the WeaponReference property that manages it. So in my join, I would expect to be able to use:

oShotQuery = oShotQuery.Join(oWeaponQuery, s => s.WeaponId, w => w.WeaponId, (s, w) => s);

But that doesn't work due to WeaponId not being a property of Shot.

Then I tried this (which again just seems wonky):

oShotQuery = oShotQuery.Join(oWeaponQuery, s => s.Weapon.WeaponId, w => w.WeaponId, (s, w) => s);

And that does work, and produces fairly concise SQL (with an exception):

SELECT 
1 AS [C1], 
[Extent1].[ShotId] AS [ShotId], 
[Extent1].[WeaponId] AS [WeaponId]
FROM  [dbo].[tblShot] AS [Extent1]
INNER JOIN [dbo].[tblWeapon] AS [Extent2] ON ([Extent1].[WeaponId] = [Extent2].[WeaponId]) OR 
(([Extent1].[WeaponId] IS NULL) AND ([Extent2].[WeaponId] IS NULL))
WHERE (CAST(CHARINDEX(N'0.5', [Extent2].[Label]) AS int)) > 0

And that exception is this: OR (([Extent1].[WeaponId] IS NULL) AND ([Extent2].[WeaponId] IS NULL)). I don't want where they're both NULL, I only want where they're equal.

share|improve this question
    
EF4 cannot be used with .Net 3.5, it has an older version of EF AFAIK. But, regardless, EF is notorious for generating horrible queries like this, and there's little you can do about it, save for using SPROCs. –  CodingGorilla Jan 31 '12 at 19:29
    
The designer.cs file is peppered with attributes like this: [global::System.CodeDom.Compiler.GeneratedCode("System.Data.Entity.Design.Entit‌​yClassGenerator", "4.0.0.0")] So I figure it must be 4.0, I know it can't run EF 4.1 - that does require .NET 4.0. –  CuppM Jan 31 '12 at 19:33
    
I'm pretty sure it's still the "EF 3.5" (with an update probably), which is probably closely related to EF4, but EF4 requires .Net 4 AFAIK. –  CodingGorilla Jan 31 '12 at 19:35
    
EF has much worse code generation than good old Linq-to-SQL. Also, its support for LINQ features is much much weaker. What a pitty. –  usr Jan 31 '12 at 20:07

1 Answer 1

What I want to do is get all the Shot objects that reference a weapon where the label contains the text 0.5.

This is the query I'd use:

var oShotQuery = oDc.Shots.Where(s => s.Weapon.Label.Contains("0.5"))

As far as the generated SQL is concerned, don't be put off if it throws in a bunch of stuff you wouldn't have thought to use. These queries tend to perform at least as well as any that you could generate manually. The key is to keep the original query simple.

Update

I want to be able to generate the different queries dynamically and then join them together later.

How about this?

var oShotQuery = oShotQuery.Where(
    o => oWeaponQuery.Any(w => w.WeaponId == o.Weapon.WeaponId))
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that would be a way to do it as all one query. But I want to be able to generate the different queries dynamically and then join them together later. –  CuppM Jan 31 '12 at 20:20
    
@CuppM: How about my update? –  StriplingWarrior Jan 31 '12 at 21:39

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