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I have an array of indices [1 ... 20]. The first 4 elements of the indicesArray are linked to a file of a certain type (call it type A), the other 16 are linked to type B.

I shuffle the array at random. I now wish to extract 4 of the indices but at most only one of the 4 can be of type A.

I think I need to use the enum function here to define indices 1-4 as "type A" & indices 5-20 as "type B", then if I looked at e.g. the first element of my freshly randomised indicesArray[0] I could tell which type it is & act accordingly.

The way I've seen enum used from examples it goes something like:

enum category { typeA = 0, typeB };

Is it possible to assign indices 1-4 to typeA & the rest to typeB, or am I on the wrong track here? thanks in advance.

Edit to include code snippet

I tried to test this & ran into an error right away

 #import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

int* indices = malloc(20*sizeof(int));

for (int i=0; i<20; i++) {

    indices[i] = i;

}

enum category {typeA, typeB};


enum category categoryForIndex(int index) {
    if (index >= 1 && index <= 4) {
        return typeA;
    } else {
        return typeB;
    }
}

[pool drain];
return 0;

}

When i try to compile this I get the error "nested functions are disabled, use -fnested-functions to re-enable", which usually happens when a second main gets thrown into the mix by accident, or someething like that. Any ideas?

Edit to include some code which shows how to put the solution into practice

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

enum category {typeA, typeB};

enum category categoryForIndex(int index) {
if (index >= 1 && index <= 4) {
    return typeA;
   } else {
    return typeB;
    }

}

int main (int argc, const char * argv[]) {
NSAutoreleasePool * pool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];

int* indices = malloc(20*sizeof(int));

for (int i=1; i<=20; i++) {

    indices[i] = i;

}


NSLog(@"index[0] is %i:", indices[16]);

enum category index;

index = indices[16];

switch (categoryForIndex(index)) {   //this tests to see what category 16 belongs to
    case typeA:
        NSLog(@"index is of type A");   
        break;
    case typeB:
        NSLog(@"index is of type B");
        break;
    default:
        NSLog(@"index not valid");
        break;
}

 [pool drain];
 return 0;

}
share|improve this question
    
beware indexes in C go from 0 to N-1, inclusive. – pmg Jan 31 '12 at 20:24
    
thanks pmg :) yes the array I refer to holds indices (which happen to start at 1) – Octave1 Feb 1 '12 at 0:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're off track. You cannot assign 1-4 a given enum. Enum constants have precisely one value, and only one. What you can do is use an enum to define two types, say typeA and typeB as you've already done, and then define a function that maps an index back to a type, e.g.

enum category categoryForIndex(int index) {
    if (index >= 1 && index <= 4) {
        return typeA;
    } else {
        return typeB;
    }
}

Now you have a way to categorize your indexes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Kevin, that makes sense, i tried it out & got an error I wasn't expecting - to do with nested functions. I've posted a little code snippet above. – Octave1 Feb 1 '12 at 0:58
2  
@Octave1: That's because you've tried to define a function within the main function of your program. You need to move it outside (such as before the main function). – dreamlax Feb 1 '12 at 1:14
    
Great that worked very well, I've posted some code which shows how to check which category a given index belongs to, as it took me a little while to figure out, and might be useful to someone. Thanks again dreamlax & Kevin. – Octave1 Feb 1 '12 at 12:35

You could do it without first shuffling the array, so that you know the A's are always at the front:

#define IndexCount 20
#define ExtractCount 4
#define TypeACount 4

int indicesRemainingCount = IndexCount;
int indices[IndexCount] = { ... }; // your indices, first 4 are type A
int chosenIndices[ExtractCount]; // to be filled with random elements from indices, max one of type A

int minIndex = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < ExtractCount; ++i) {
    int j = minIndex + arc4random_uniform(indicesRemainingCount - minIndex);
    chosenIndices[i] = indices[j];
    if (j < TypeACount) {
        // Set minIndex so I won't pick another A.
        minIndex = TypeACount;
    } else {
        // Remove the chosen B so I don't pick it again.
        --indicesRemainingCount;
        indices[j] = indices[indicesRemainingCount];
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is reasonable as long as you're willing to destructively modify the input array. – Kevin Ballard Feb 1 '12 at 1:38
    
He said he wanted to shuffle it. So he was going to either modify it or copy it. – rob mayoff Feb 1 '12 at 2:04
    
By "destructively" I mean you're throwing away data about what was in the array to begin with. Rather than swapping cells, you're overwriting them. Granted, if you did change that to a swap, then it becomes equivalent to the shuffle case. – Kevin Ballard Feb 1 '12 at 3:16

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