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I have two tables. Table 1 is a master list of equipment with equipment_id and equipment_description. So, let's say for this table I have ten equipment_id's. 1,2,3....10 each with some description attached.

Table 2 logs when the equipment has been inspected:

equipment_id|inspection_date
       1    |    '1-22-2012'
       2    |    '1-22-2012'
       4    |    '1-22-2012'
       2    |    '1-23-2012'
       3    |    '1-23-2012'

I've created a view, v_dates which pulls out of table 2 all of the distinct inspection dates - not sure if I needed it but did it anyway.

I would like to create another view which shows all equipment that was NOT inspected for each date in the v_dates. So it would show:

3 | '1-22-2012'
5 | '1-22-2012'

and so on.

Rookie here and just not sure how to join these tables correctly. Can't get it to work and would appreciate any help.

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What SQL server software are you using? –  Graham Jan 31 '12 at 20:31
3  
On a day when no inspections occur, do you want to see all the entries? If so, then this'll be easier with a reference table listing all possible inspection dates. –  Mike Ryan Jan 31 '12 at 20:35
1  
Questions of this nature are awkward because you have two relations, and you're sort of asking for the result of when both sets are missing information. @MikeRyan is right - a reference table of dates when inspections should have occurred makes this much easier to solve. –  Yuck Jan 31 '12 at 20:36
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3 Answers

Untested, but I think this should give the desired result:

SELECT i.id,d.date FROM 
    ( SELECT DISTINCT inspection_date AS date FROM inspections ORDER BY 1 ) d 
  LEFT JOIN 
    inspections i 
  ON d.date=i.date
WHERE i.date IS NULL
GROUP BY 1,2
ORDER BY 1,2

Like mentioned in the comments would a table with inspection dates really help.

share|improve this answer
    
DGW Thanks for your help as well. I'll see what results I get. –  Scott Feb 1 '12 at 16:40
    
This doesn't show the equipment_id though. Also - GROUP BY and ORDER BY ordinal position is ucky and dangerous. –  Yuck Feb 1 '12 at 17:37
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The following appears to work based on my test data using SQL SERVER 2005. I am using a CROSS JOIN of distinct dates along with a LEFT JOIN to throw out EQUIPMENT_ID records that exist for those dates.

Sorry, I am having problems getting my code formatting correct with tabs and spaces...

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#EQUIPMENT') IS NOT NULL
    DROP TABLE #EQUIPMENT

CREATE TABLE #EQUIPMENT
    (   EQUIPMENT_ID        smallint,
        EQUIPMENT_DESC  varchar(32)
    )

INSERT INTO #EQUIPMENT
    (   EQUIPMENT_ID,   EQUIPMENT_DESC  )
            SELECT  1,  'AAA'
UNION   SELECT  2,  'BBB'
UNION   SELECT  3,  'CCC'
UNION   SELECT  4,  'DDD'
UNION   SELECT  5,  'EEE'
UNION   SELECT  6,  'FFF'
UNION   SELECT  7,  'GGG'
UNION   SELECT  8,  'HHH'
UNION   SELECT  9,  'III'
UNION   SELECT  10, 'JJJ'

IF OBJECT_ID('tempdb..#INSPECTION') IS NOT NULL
    DROP TABLE #INSPECTION

CREATE TABLE #INSPECTION
    (   EQUIPMENT_ID        smallint,
        INSPECTION_DATE smalldatetime
    )

INSERT INTO #INSPECTION
    (   EQUIPMENT_ID, INSPECTION_DATE   )
            SELECT  1, '1-22-2012'
UNION SELECT    1, '1-27-2012'
UNION SELECT    3, '1-27-2012'
UNION SELECT    5, '1-29-2012'
UNION SELECT    7, '1-22-2012'
UNION SELECT    7, '1-27-2012'
UNION SELECT    7, '1-29-2012'

SELECT  E.EQUIPMENT_ID, D.INSPECTION_DATE
FROM        #EQUIPMENT          E
CROSS   JOIN    (   SELECT  DISTINCT INSPECTION_DATE
                            FROM        #INSPECTION
                        )   D
LEFT JOIN   #INSPECTION     I2
    ON      E.EQUIPMENT_ID = I2.EQUIPMENT_ID
    AND     D.INSPECTION_DATE = I2.INSPECTION_DATE
WHERE   I2.EQUIPMENT_ID IS NULL
ORDER BY E.EQUIPMENT_ID, D.INSPECTION_DATE
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks John for your help. –  Scott Feb 1 '12 at 16:39
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As per my comment to the question, you really need a table of valid inspection dates. It makes the sql much more sensible, and besides it's the only way to do it if you want to see all items listed for dates when inspections were supposed to be done, but no inspections were done.

So, assuming the two tables:

 create table inspections (equipment_id int, inspection_date date);

 create table inspection_dates (id int, inspection_date date);

Then a join to get all the equipment that does not have an inspection on a date when an inspection should have taken place would be:

 select i.equipment_id, id.inspection_date
 from inspection_dates id, 
    (select distinct equipment_id from inspections) i
 where not exists (select * from inspections i2
                       where i2.inspection_date = id.inspection_date
                            and i2.equipment_id = i.equipment_id);

You want the combos that do not exist. Thus the not exists predicate.

Note again, that presumably you would have a table for all the unique equipment_ids, but not knowing that I had to construct it myself in place.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mike. The inspections SHOULD be every day of the year but there might be days where they are not performed. My report was showing the inspections they did but thought that it might be helpful to show what inspections were missed as well. Trying this in mysql but will be running after I get finished on oracle. –  Scott Feb 1 '12 at 16:44
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