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Is it possible to copy this functionality of offering an abstract method in an enum that inner enum constants must override and provide functionality to?

public enum Logic {
    PAY_DAY {
        @Override
        public void acceptPlayer(Player player) {
            // Perform logic
        }
    },
    COLLECT_CASH {
        @Override
        public void acceptPlayer(Player player) {
            // Perform logic
        }
    }
    ,
    ETC_ETC {
        @Override
        public void acceptPlayer(Player player) {
            // Perform logic
        }
    };

    public abstract void acceptPlayer(Player player);
}

If it can't:: Could you provide a way which I can implement lots of specific logic in a similar manner?

Edit :: I know that enums in C# are not really 'objects' like they are in Java, but I wish to perform similar logic.

Edit :: To clarify, I do not want to provide concrete classes for each specific bit of logic. IE, creating an interface acceptPlayer and creating many new classes is not appropiate

share|improve this question
    
This is not possible in C# enums - there is no support for such a feature. – Oded Jan 31 '12 at 20:37
    
And instead of explaining what you don't want, tell us what you do to achieve. – Oded Jan 31 '12 at 20:39
    
You could create an Action factory that you pass it a value and it gives you back a related Action to execute. – M.Babcock Jan 31 '12 at 20:41
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's one option - not using enums, but something similar-ish...

public abstract class Logic
{
    public static readonly Logic PayDay = new PayDayImpl();
    public static readonly Logic CollectCash = new CollectCashImpl();
    public static readonly Logic EtcEtc = new EtcEtcImpl();

    // Prevent other classes from subclassing
    private Logic() {}

    public abstract void AcceptPlayer(Player player);

    private class PayDayImpl : Logic
    {
        public override void AcceptPlayer(Player player)
        {
            // Perform logic
        }
    }

    private class CollectCashImpl : Logic
    {
        public override void AcceptPlayer(Player player)
        {
            // Perform logic
        }
    }

    private class EtcEtcImpl : Logic
    {
        public override void AcceptPlayer(Player player)
        {
            // Perform logic
        }
    }
}

You say that you don't want to provide a concrete class for each bit of logic - but that's basically what you'd be doing in Java anyway, it's just that the class would be slightly hidden from you.

Here's an alternative approach using delegates for the varying behaviour:

public sealed class Logic
{
    public static readonly Logic PayDay = new Logic(PayDayAccept);
    public static readonly Logic CollectCash = new Logic(CollectCashAccept);
    public static readonly Logic EtcEtc = new Logic(player => {
        // An alternative using lambdas...
    });

    private readonly Action<Player> accept;

    private Logic(Action<Player> accept)
    {
        this.accept = accept;
    }

    public void AcceptPlayer(Player player)
    {
        accept(player);
    }

    private static void PayDayAccept(Player player)
    {
        // Logic here
    }

    private static void CollectCashAccept(Player player)
    {
        // Logic here
    }
}

In both cases, you still get a fixed set of values - but you won't be able to switch on them. You could potentially have a separate "real" enum, but that would be a bit messy.

share|improve this answer
    
I did see this as an option, but it's still providing concrete classes really. Can something be done with delegates perhaps? – AlanFoster Jan 31 '12 at 20:44
    
Hey I feel pretty cool, I thought of the same solution as Jon Skeet (and I hadn't even seen his first). I am DA MAN. – Aidan Jan 31 '12 at 21:01
    
@AlanFoster: The enum solution in Java is "still providing concrete classes really" - so why is it okay for you in Java but not in C#? Note that I've provided two bits of code here - the second does use delegates. – Jon Skeet Jan 31 '12 at 21:03
    
@JonSkeet ah, the second looks much cleaner. Any reason why you wouldn't use a struct here and be closer to enums? – nawfal Jun 10 '13 at 21:14
1  
@nawfal: Right, yes. Enums in C# aren't really "safe" in that you can just cast from any value of the underlying type to the enum. They're named numbers rather than a set of valid values. – Jon Skeet Jun 11 '13 at 5:40

If you don't want to use interfaces and a class hierarchy, you could use delegates, something like :

public class Player{}

public static class Logic
{
    public static readonly Action<Player> PAY_DAY = p => Console.WriteLine( "Pay day : " + p.ToString());

    public static readonly Action<Player> COLLECT_CASH = p=> Console.WriteLine(p.ToString ());

    public static void AcceptPlayer( this Action<Player> PlayerAction, Player ActingPlayer )
    {
        PlayerAction(ActingPlayer);
    }
}

class MainClass
{
    public static void Main (string[] args)
    {
        var player = new Player();

        Logic.PAY_DAY.AcceptPlayer( player );
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Can I ask what the name of this is? How is it that player.AcceptPlayer is now a valid method for player, when you declared it in a different class? – AlanFoster Jan 31 '12 at 21:39
    
It's an extension method (actually I have edited it so that it works more like your question) : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb383977.aspx. The this keyword on the first argument means that any instance of the Action<Player> type will have the AcceptPlayer method associated with it. – Aidan Jan 31 '12 at 21:43

In c#, you do this with classes, not enums. Create a base class with the virtual method you want to override.

Each member of the Java enum will be a sub-class with the implementation you want.

Finally, create a read-only static field in the base class for each enum member, initializing it with an instance of the sub-class for that enum value.

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