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I need to iterate over a list (or whatever enumeration), but I'd like to add values into the list in the course of the iteration.

This is an example.

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    List<int> hello = new List<int>();

    hello.Add(1); hello.Add(2); hello.Add(3);

    foreach (var x in hello)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        if (x == 1) {
            hello.Add(100);
        }
    }
}

I expect to get "1,2,3,100", but instead I got this error.

enter image description here

How can I iterate over a list that is changing in the process?

ADDED

What I want to accomplish is that I iterate over elements to process something. The thing is that some of the elements needs to be decomposed into sub elements on and on.

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    List<Element> hello = new List<Element>();

    hello.Add(Element); hello.Add(Element); hello.Add(Element);

    foreach (var x in hello)
    {
        List<Element> decomposed;
        decomposed = Decompose(x);
        if (decomposed != null) {
            foreach (var y in decomposed)
            {
                hello.Add(y);
            }
        }
    }
}
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The data structure you are most likely looking for is Queue - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Queue_%28data_structure%29 (or Stack, depending on order of operations you want to perform). –  Alexei Levenkov Jan 31 '12 at 21:40
    
I agree, with a Queue you could while (queue.Count() > 1) then dequeue/enqueue within the loop. –  Kieren Johnstone Feb 1 '12 at 0:23
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7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't, basically. Not with a foreach loop, anyway. You can use a straight for loop:

for (int i = 0; i < hello.Count; i++)
{
    int x = hello[i];
    Console.WriteLine(x);
    if (x == 1) {
        hello.Add(100);
    }
}

I would personally try to avoid doing it in the first place though - it can get very hard to reason about whether you'll ever complete, or if you'll skip items (if you're removing instead of adding, or adding before your current position).

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You can't. You should create a new list and store the values in there.

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    List<int> hello = new List<int>();
    List<int> additions = new List<int>();
    hello.Add(1); hello.Add(2); hello.Add(3);

    foreach (var x in hello)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        if (x == 1) {
            additions.Add(100);
        }
    }

    hello.AddRange(additions);
}
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Use a snapshot of it instead:

foreach (var x in hello.ToArray())
{
    // whatever here
}

Problem solved! Well, in a way. Items added during iteration would not be included.

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No, you can't iterate over a list and modify them in the same iteration. Use a new list instead.

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Using foreach you can't! You could use a for-loop, but it's very very bad style to do things like this. Things like this make your code very error prone, unpredictable and hard to debug.

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A for loop is not difficult to understand. Why exactly is it a bad style to do something in one construct? Error prone? Not really. Unpredictable? No, entirely predictable. Hard to debug? As hard as looking a single variable in the watch window.. –  Kieren Johnstone Jan 31 '12 at 21:07
    
@KierenJohnstone: then do something like this: List<int> intlist = new List<int>() {1,2}; for(int i=0; i < intList.Count; i++) { if( intList[i] %2 != 0 ) intList.Add(1); else intList.Add(2); } –  Mithrandir Jan 31 '12 at 21:12
    
..so because it's not a single button event handler with a single construct it's difficult? You know programmers write operating systems, device drivers and RDBMSes? If you can't (or more worryingly, don't want to) get your head around what you posted, you're severely stunting your growth (and career) as a developer –  Kieren Johnstone Feb 1 '12 at 0:22
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I found that there is stack in C#. I guess I could use stack.

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    Stack<int> hello = new Stack<int>();
    hello.Push(1); hello.Push(2); hello.Push(3);

    while (hello.Count > 0)
    {
        int x = hello.Pop();
        Console.WriteLine(x);
        if (x == 1) {
            hello.Push(100);
        }
    }
}
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There are answers that claims what you want cannot be achieved with foreach. That claim is wrong, all you need to do is to write a custom class with a custom enumerator.

   public class CustomList : IEnumerable<int>
   {
      readonly List<int> list = new List<int>{1,2,3,4};
      private int now = 0;

      public void Add(int n)
      {
         list.Add(n);
      }

      public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator()
      {
         while (now<list.Count)
         {
            yield return list[now];
            now++;
         }
      }

      IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
      {
         return GetEnumerator();
      }
   }

Now the following piece of code will print 1,2,3,4 and 100 to the screen:

 var list = new CustomList();
 foreach (int n in list)
 {
    if(n==1)
       list.Add(100);
    Console.WriteLine(n);
 }

But I write this only as a proof of concept. You don't want to do this. If you will only add new items on the back, use Queue as others has said. If you will always add new items on the front, use Stack. If you will need both, write a custom LinkedList class with Dequeue (=Pop), Enqueue and Push operations, use something like :

while(list.notEmpty()) 
  var item = list.Dequeue();
  //bla bla

and you are all set. (You could even write a custom Enumerator again, to use with foreach, but we are destructing the list as we go, so it is against the spirit of Enumerations, and why bother in any case)

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