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I'm new to java so apologies if I've got totally the wrong end of the stick.

I'm trying to write a generic (in the English sense of the word!) Data Access class. eg I currently have:

public class DA<T> {
public static Dao getAccountDao() throws NamingException, SQLException {
    Context ctx = new InitialContext();
    DataSource dataSource = (DataSource)ctx.lookup("java:comp/env/jdbc/test");
    ConnectionSource connectionSource = new DataSourceConnectionSource(dataSource, new MysqlDatabaseType());            
    Dao<Account, Integer> accountDao =  DaoManager.createDao(connectionSource, Account.class);
    return accountDao;
}
}

And I can call this with:

Dao<Account, Integer> accountDao = DA.getAccountDao();

But I'll need a version of this for every Dao/model. So I'm trying to make something that can be called like:

Dao<SomeClass, Integer> someClassDao = DA.getDao(SomeClass);

Is this even possible?

I've tried things like:

public class DA {
public static Dao getDao(<T>) throws NamingException, SQLException {
    Context ctx = new InitialContext();
    DataSource dataSource = (DataSource)ctx.lookup("java:comp/env/jdbc/test");
    ConnectionSource connectionSource = new DataSourceConnectionSource(dataSource, new MysqlDatabaseType());            
    Dao<T, Integer> accountDao =  DaoManager.createDao(connectionSource, T.class);
    return accountDao;
}

}

but Netbeans gives the error: illegal start of type

My brain is struggling with generics, is this something they can do?!

EDIT: With help from the posts below I've got to:

public class DA<T> {
public static Dao<T, Integer> getDao(T daoType) throws NamingException, SQLException {
    Dao<T, Integer> accountDao =  DaoManager.createDao(T.class);
    return accountDao;
}

}

Which generates two errors: non-static type variable T cannot be referenced from a static context and if I remove the static keyword, I get: cannot select from a type variable I need to read up on how generics and static work together, but the 2nd looks like a consequence of erasure (http://www.coderanch.com/t/386358/java/java/Converting-type-parameters-class) , so not sure if it's going to be possible.

Should have mentioned earlier, the Dao stuff is using an ORM library called ORMLite, so createDao etc isn't my code.

share|improve this question
    
i needed to achieve a similar purpose of yours and was going the same route as you. but the library ORMLite, you're using, suggests a different way to go about this. This comment doesn't answer your question but would probably help you achieve your overall purpose in a better way. See this SO question for more details. Hope it helps. –  Kaushik Gopal Dec 9 '13 at 0:55
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To access what you mean by T.class, you'll have to pass the class object into the method:

class Account {}

class Dao<TEntity, TId> {}

class DA {
    // your DaoManager.createDao() will also need a similar signature
    public static <TEntity> Dao<TEntity, Integer> getDao(Class<TEntity> daoType) {
        /// yadda blah, create DAO as appropriate
        return new Dao<TEntity, Integer>();
    }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // Pass the class literal for what you want TEntity to be as a parameter
        Dao<Account, Integer> dao = DA.getDao(Account.class);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why is this so? The compiler knows what type T is. Why have to pass another parameter? In C# you can use typeof(T) and do not need that extra useless parameter. –  Greg Ennis Mar 2 at 2:43
    
@GregEnnis The absolutely fundamental difference between Java's and C#'s implementation of generics is that in Java, typeof(T) does not exist. Java deliberately, in the interest of backwards compatibility, generates code for a generic method after performing type erasure. The compiler only knows what T stands for at the call site of getDao() – this information is not propagated into that call of the method in any way. –  millimoose Mar 2 at 3:54
    
@GregEnnis What C# does differently in this specific situation is that it somehow automagically propagates the runtime value of typeof(T) from the caller to the callee. (It might do this by automagically inserting a Type parameter to the method, or it might do so by generating different code for every needed instantiation of a type / method, or something else entirely. The mechanism isn't really important.) This however breaks compatibility a lot – "nongeneric" code can't call generified APIs. –  millimoose Mar 2 at 4:04
    
@GregEnnis As an example of this incompatibility: In Java, it was possible to "retrofit" the java.util collection classes to use generics. In C# this was impossible (old code that doesn't provide a value for typeof(T) cannot call new code that might rely on that value being available) hence the completely new System.Collections.Generic namespace. For an example of why that's a problem, just look at the ASP.NET Web Forms APIs, where, say, ControlCollection does not implement IEnumerable<Control>; or Repeater et al. aren't type–safe. –  millimoose Mar 2 at 4:06
    
OK thanks for the explanation. Didn't mean to hit a nerve there :) –  Greg Ennis Mar 3 at 13:59
show 4 more comments

You want your DA class to have two types (e.g., <Account, Integer>) but in your class declaration you're only specifying one type <T>. Have a look at some documentation and examples such as these:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Generics_in_Java#Generic_class_definitions
http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/index.html

share|improve this answer
    
Seems to me he just wants the second parameter to always be Integer. I'm assuming it's the type of the primary key of an entity in which case Integer or Long is a reasonable thing to hardcode in a utility like this. –  millimoose Jan 31 '12 at 22:54
    
@Inerdial - Correct! –  Mark Jan 31 '12 at 23:50
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You'll have to do it this way:

public class DA {
        public static <T> Dao<T,Integer> getDao(Class<T> clazz) throws NamingException, SQLException {
            Context ctx = new InitialContext();
            DataSource dataSource = (DataSource)ctx.lookup("java:comp/env/jdbc/test");
            ConnectionSource connectionSource = new DataSourceConnectionSource(dataSource, new MysqlDatabaseType());            
            Dao<T, Integer> accountDao =  DaoManager.createDao(connectionSource, clazz);
            return accountDao;
        }
    }

Also createDao method will have signature like this:

public static <T> Dao<T,Integer> createDao(ConnectionSource source,Class<T> clazz) {
 ...
}
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If you need to specify a method that takes a template parameter type, the template comes before the return type:

<T> void foo(T param) { ... }
share|improve this answer
    
"template parameter" is a terrible name for this. Generics and templates are wildly different concepts that have some overlap in what they achieve. –  millimoose Jan 31 '12 at 22:47
    
Also, just adding a type parameter to the method wouldn't do what the OP wants to. –  millimoose Jan 31 '12 at 22:48
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