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I would like to use events to communicate between my objects in a google closure (GC) environment.

Suppose I have two classes foobar.Boss and foobar.Employee. The Boss wants to know when the Employee has made coffee, and whether or not that coffee is decaf (he's laying off the caffeine this week).

GC has made classes available that seem to provide the means to do this, goog.events.Event and goog.events.EventTarget.

Without knowing better, I'd think it would work like this:

foobar.Employee.prototype.makeCoffee = function(isDecaf)
{        
    this.coffeeMaker.putCoffeeInMachine(isDecaf);
    this.coffeeMaker.start();
    var event = new goog.event.Event('COFFEE_ON', { isDecaf: isDecaf });
    goog.events.dispatchEvent(event);
}

foobar.Boss.prototype.addEmployee = function(employee)
{
    ...
    goog.events.listen(employee, 'COFFEE_ON', function(e)
    {
        if (e.target.isDecaf)
        {
            this.refillMug();
        }
    }, false, this);
    ...
}

Is this a correct pattern? I am confused by the class goog.events.EventTarget -- how does a target dispatch events? Doesn't a target have things happen to it?

This question is helpful, but a more direct answer would be appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
code.google.com/p/closure-library/source/browse/trunk/closure/… Is an example implementation -- inheriting from goog.events.EventTarget seems strange (is it completely necessary that Employee extends EventTarget?) –  Ben Flynn Jan 31 '12 at 23:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Having looked at this for a while, my understanding is now that the EventTarget in fact plays a dual roll of being the entity that dispatches events and the entity that is listened to. So one option would be to have Employee inherit goog.events.EventTarget but I have gone a different route.

First I created a new event type that would let the Boss know if the coffee was decaf.

/**
 * @constructor
 * @extends {goog.events.Event}
 */
foobar.CoffeeEvent = function(isDecaf)
{
  goog.events.Event.call(this, 'COFFEE_ON');
  this.isDecaf = isDecaf;
};
goog.inherits(foobar.CoffeeEvent, goog.events.Event);

Next I created an event listener type to dispatch these events.

/**
 * @constructor
 * @extends {goog.events.EventTarget} 
 */
foobar.CoffeeEventTarget = function()
{
  goog.events.EventTarget.call(this);
};
goog.inherits(foobar.CoffeeEventTarget, goog.events.EventTarget);

I added an object of this type to my Employee.

foobar.Employee = function()
{
  ...
  this.coffeeEvents = new foobar.CoffeeEventTarget();
  ...
}

When the employee refills the coffee:

foobar.Employee.prototype.makeCoffee = function(isDecaf)
{        
    this.coffeeMaker.putCoffeeInMachine(isDecaf);
    this.coffeeMaker.start();
    var event = new foobar.CoffeeEvent(isDecaf);
    this.coffeeEvents.dispatchEvent(event);
}

Mr. Bossman listens for this.

foobar.Boss.prototype.addEmployee = function(employee)
{
    ...
    goog.events.listen(employee.coffeeEvents, 'COFFEE_ON', function(e)
    {
        if (e.isDecaf)
        {
            this.refillMug();
        }
    }, false, this);
    ...
}

Note that this won't tell me which employee refilled the coffee, because the event target will an instance of CoffeeEventTarget. If you wanted all of Employee in there I suppose you could add it as a member field. If you were OK with inheriting to Employee from goog.events.EventTarget then you get Employee for free as the target.

share|improve this answer
    
foobar.CoffeeEvent should probably accept a type, rather than having it hardcoded. This would be a good use for an enum. –  Ben Flynn Feb 1 '12 at 21:08
    
Still looking at this. There is probably no real need in my case to subclass EventTarget. –  Ben Flynn Feb 3 '12 at 6:20

The way I think of EventTarget is this:

A button is a target, which you can register to be notified about its click event whenever one takes place. Thus, the "target" of a click is the button (you aim at the button, then click on it). But when the button gets clicked, it's not the mouse that tells everyone that the button was clicked - the button itself dispatches that message.

To touch on the question brought up by @ben-flynn about why would someone need/want to subclass EventTarget:

If you want to listen for key down events, you probably care about what key was pressed. The way you'd know what key was pressed is by looking up the keyCode field on the event object that is dispatched by the KeyDownEventTarget. On the other hand, a ButtonEventTarget dispatches a different event object, namely a ClickEvent, which does not have a keyCode field in it. So to summarize, the reason you'd subclass EventTarget is so whoever is listening for events that will be dispatched by that target know what event object will be dispatched when the event is triggered.

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