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In Java, I can access a public member of a class using . as can be seen in the second line of the main method in the following example (for the sake of this example, ignore my poor use of encapsulation).

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Position p = new Position(0,0);
        int a = p.x; // example of member access
    }
}

class Position {
    public int x;
    public int y;

    public Position(int x, int y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }
}

Is the . considered an operator in the Java programming language, just as *, ~, and != are considered operators?


Edit - Extending the above example:

As has been pointed out, it seems that the Java language specification considers . to be a separator and not an operator. Yet, I would like to point out that . exhibits some behavior that does seem rather operator-ish. Consider the above example extended to the following:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Position p = new Position(0,0);
        int a = p . x; // a -> 0
        int x = 1;
        int b = p . x + x; // b -> 1
    }
}

class Position {
    public int x;
    public int y;

    public Position(int x, int y) {
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
    }
}

It is clear that some precedence is being enforced such that the member access is evaluated before the addition. This seems intuitive because if the addition were to be evaluated first, then we would have p.2 which is nonsense. Nevertheless, it is clear that . is exhibiting behavior that the other separators don't.

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Consider leaving out the "this" syntax. It's bad practice in the java world, super in the other hand is alright when you extend classes. –  Tom Jan 31 '12 at 23:09
3  
@Tom If I got rid of the uses of this in my example, then my public fields would not get instantiated and I would have a run-time error. Also, that isn't particularly relavent to my question. –  jbranchaud Jan 31 '12 at 23:15
3  
@Tom Your opinion maybe, but hardly a general rule. I personally find the use of this in setters and constructors far superior to inventing some new names for the parameters so I can distinguish them and the fields. –  Voo Feb 1 '12 at 0:12
1  
@Tom - Unnecessary uses of this. are (perhaps) bad practice. In OP's code, this. is required in every case for proper behavior of the code. –  Ted Hopp Feb 1 '12 at 0:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

It's considered a separator, not an operator. See the Java Language Specification sections 3.11 and 3.12 for a list of all separators and operators.

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I still have some uncertainty. In the context of a double (e.g. 1.1), it seems like a separator, but it seems to be more of an operator in the context of member access. –  jbranchaud Jan 31 '12 at 23:04
    
@Treebranch - In the discussion on access control, the JLS describes qualified names: "a "." token appears, preceded by some indication of a package, type, or expression having a type and followed by an Identifier that names a member of the package or type." So there it's a "token" and more like punctuation (i.e., separator) than an operator. In any event, the exact classification of the "." token isn't as important in Java as it is in, say, C++, because Java doesn't allow operator overriding. –  Ted Hopp Jan 31 '12 at 23:15
    
It makes sense when put like that, thanks for the explanation! –  jbranchaud Jan 31 '12 at 23:17
    
After thinking about it a little more, I have extending my example which can be seen above which considers the precedence enforced by .. Your thoughts? –  jbranchaud Jan 31 '12 at 23:36
2  
@Treebranch - An identifier can be qualified (e.g., this.x) or not (e.g., x). The qualifier is part of the identifier. That (and not operator precedence) is what's going on in your second example. To put it another way by way of an example: from the JLS description, it's clear that this.(p.x) could never be valid, regardless of the type of p. The token "." just doesn't work like an operator. –  Ted Hopp Feb 1 '12 at 0:12

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