Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Problem:

Step 1: Given a list of numbers, generate all possible groupings (in order) given only the final number of desired groups.

For example, if my list of numbers were 1 to 4, and I wanted 2 final groups, the possibilities would be:

[1], [2,3,4]

[1,2], [3,4]

[1,2,3], [4]

Step 2: Perform arithmetic operations on those groups.

For example, if we chose addition, the final results would be:

1 + 234 = 235
12 + 34 = 46
123 + 4 = 127

Prior Research and Similar Problems

I've seen numerous examples on SO and elsewhere for problems involving variable amounts of groups, which utilize ranges and for loops, a la:

print [num_list[i:i+groups] for i in range(0,len(num_list),groups)]

But that's kind of the reverse of what I want - there, the lengths of the groups themselves are fixed save for the final one, and the number of groups oscillates.

This isn't homework, just an interesting problem I came across. Ideally, I'd need to be able to iterate over those separate sublists in order to perform the mathematical operations, so they'd need to be captured as well.

I have a feeling the solution will involve itertools, but I can't seem to figure out the combinatorics with grouping aspect.

Edit/Extension of Step 2

If I want to perform different operations on each of the partitions, can I still approach this the same way? Rather than specifiying just int.add, can I somehow perform yet another combination of all the main 4 operations? I.e.:

symbol_list = ['+','-','*','/']
for op in symbol_list:
   #something

I'd wind up with possibilities of:

1 + 2 * 34
1 * 2 - 34
1 / 2 + 34
etc.

Order of operations can be ignored.

Final Solution:

#!/usr/bin/env python

import sys
from itertools import combinations, chain, product

# fixed vars
num_list = range(_,_) # the initial list
groups = _ # number of groups
target = _ # any target desired
op_dict = {'+': int.__add__, '-': int.__sub__,
           '*': int.__mul__, '/': int.__div__}

def op_iter_reduce(ops, values):
    op_iter = lambda a, (i, b): op_dict[ops[i]](a, b)
    return reduce(op_iter, enumerate(values[1:]), values[0])

def split_list(data, n):
    for splits in combinations(range(1, len(data)), n-1):
        result = []
        prev = None
        for split in chain(splits, [None]):
            result.append(data[prev:split])
            prev = split
        yield result

def list_to_int(data):
    result = 0
    for h, v in enumerate(reversed(data)):
        result += 10**h * v
    return result

def group_and_map(data, num_groups):
    template = ['']*(num_groups*2 - 1) + ['=', '']
    for groups in split_list(data, num_groups):
        ints = map(list_to_int, groups)
        template[:-2:2] = map(str, ints)
        for ops in product('+-*/', repeat=num_groups-1):
            template[1:-2:2] = ops
            template[-1] = str(op_iter_reduce(ops, ints))
            if op_iter_reduce(ops, ints) == target:
                print ' '.join(template)

group_and_map(num_list, groups)
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Step 1: The easiest way I have found to think of splitting lists into groups like that is to try to get combinations of split locations. Here is an implementation:

def split_list(data, n):
    from itertools import combinations, chain
    for splits in combinations(range(1, len(data)), n-1):
        result = []
        prev = None
        for split in chain(splits, [None]):
            result.append(data[prev:split])
            prev = split
        yield result

>>> list(split_list([1, 2, 3, 4], 2))
[[[1], [2, 3, 4]], [[1, 2], [3, 4]], [[1, 2, 3], [4]]]
>>> list(split_list([1, 2, 3, 4], 3))
[[[1], [2], [3, 4]], [[1], [2, 3], [4]], [[1, 2], [3], [4]]]

Step 2: First you need to convert a list like [[1], [2, 3, 4]], to one like [1, 234]. You can do this with the following function:

def list_to_int(data):
    result = 0
    for i, v in enumerate(reversed(data)):
        result += 10**i * v
    return result

>>> map(list_to_int, [[1], [2, 3], [4, 5, 6]])
[1, 23, 456]

Now you can perform your operation on the resulting list using reduce():

>>> import operator
>>> reduce(operator.add, [1, 23, 456])  # or int.__add__ instead of operator.add
480

Complete solution: Based on edit referencing need for different operators:

def op_iter_reduce(ops, values):
    op_dict = {'+': int.__add__, '-': int.__sub__,
               '*': int.__mul__, '/': int.__div__}
    op_iter = lambda a, (i, b): op_dict[ops[i]](a, b)
    return reduce(op_iter, enumerate(values[1:]), values[0])

def group_and_map(data, num_groups):
    from itertools import combinations_with_replacement
    op_dict = {'+': int.__add__, '-': int.__sub__,
               '*': int.__mul__, '/': int.__div__}
    template = ['']*(num_groups*2 - 1) + ['=', '']
    op_iter = lambda a, (i, b): op_dict[ops[i]](a, b)
    for groups in split_list(data, num_groups):
        ints = map(list_to_int, groups)
        template[:-2:2] = map(str, ints)
        for ops in combinations_with_replacement('+-*/', num_groups-1):
            template[1:-2:2] = ops
            template[-1] = str(op_iter_reduce(ops, ints))
            print ' '.join(template)

>>> group_and_map([1, 2, 3, 4], 2)
1 + 234 = 235
1 - 234 = -233
1 * 234 = 234
1 / 234 = 0
12 + 34 = 46
12 - 34 = -22
12 * 34 = 408
12 / 34 = 0
123 + 4 = 127
123 - 4 = 119
123 * 4 = 492
123 / 4 = 30

If you are on Python 2.6 or below and itertools.combinations_with_replacement() is not available, you can use the recipe linked here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this works well too. The enumeration part has me a bit confused - need to look over that. As per the edit, I'm trying to figure out how to add a loop over all 4 main arithmetic operations. So instead of adding all of them, I could try all permutations of a + b -c, a * b / c, etc. –  Brett Woodward Jan 31 '12 at 23:57
    
@BrettWoodward - Would you want to maintain order of operations or always calculate from left to right (should 1 + 2 * 34 actually calculate (1 + 2) * 34 instead of the normal 1 + (2 * 34)). –  Andrew Clark Feb 1 '12 at 0:05
    
In this case, OoO can be ignored. As in, always left to right. I was thinking of using lambda for that, but not sure how to iterate over different operators. –  Brett Woodward Feb 1 '12 at 0:14
    
@BrettWoodward - Okay, my recent edit now works by iterating over basic math operators. –  Andrew Clark Feb 1 '12 at 0:42
    
That's superb, thank you. I was struggling for the past few hours over something though - it didn't seem to be creating all the permutations I needed. I wound up swapping out combinations_with_replacement for product - that generates all possible repetitive arithmetic operators. And I got it to work. Fantastic, thanks all. –  Brett Woodward Feb 1 '12 at 3:19

Raymond Hettinger has written a recipe for finding all partitions of an iterable into n groups:

import itertools
import operator

def partition_indices(length, groups, chain = itertools.chain):
    first, middle, last = [0], range(1, length), [length]    
    for div in itertools.combinations(middle, groups-1):
        yield tuple(itertools.izip(chain(first, div), chain(div, last)))

def partition_into_n_groups(iterable, groups, chain = itertools.chain):
    # http://code.activestate.com/recipes/576795/
    # author: Raymond Hettinger
    # In [1]: list(partition_into_n_groups('abcd',2))
    # Out[1]: [('a', 'bcd'), ('ab', 'cd'), ('abc', 'd')]
    s = iterable if hasattr(iterable, '__getitem__') else tuple(iterable)
    for indices in partition_indices(len(s), groups, chain):
        yield tuple(s[slice(*x)] for x in indices)

def equations(iterable, groups):
    operators = (operator.add, operator.sub, operator.mul, operator.truediv)
    strfop = dict(zip(operators,'+-*/'))
    for partition in partition_into_n_groups(iterable, groups):
        nums_list = [int(''.join(map(str,item))) for item in partition]
        op_groups = itertools.product(operators, repeat = groups-1)
        for op_group in op_groups:
            nums = iter(nums_list)
            result = next(nums)
            expr = [result]
            for op in op_group:
                num = next(nums)
                result = op(result, num)
                expr.extend((op, num))
            expr = ' '.join(strfop.get(item,str(item)) for item in expr)
            yield '{e} = {r}'.format(e = expr, r = result)

for eq in equations(range(1,5), groups = 2):
    print(eq)

yields

1 + 234 = 235
1 - 234 = -233
1 * 234 = 234
1 / 234 = 0.0042735042735
12 + 34 = 46
12 - 34 = -22
12 * 34 = 408
12 / 34 = 0.352941176471
123 + 4 = 127
123 - 4 = 119
123 * 4 = 492
123 / 4 = 30.75
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this also works well. I'm trying to work through the syntax there. As per the edit, I'm trying to figure out how to add a loop over all 4 main arithmetic operations. So instead of adding all of them, I could try all permutations of a + b -c, a * b / c, etc. –  Brett Woodward Jan 31 '12 at 23:57

Step 1:

I worked on all the possible combinations of the indexes:

from itertools import combinations

def cut(lst, indexes):
    last = 0
    for i in indexes:
        yield lst[last:i]
        last = i
    yield lst[last:]


def generate(lst, n):
    for indexes in combinations(list(range(1,len(lst))), n - 1):
        yield list(cut(lst, indexes))

Example:

for g in generate([1, 2, 3, 4, 5], 3):
    print(g)
"""
[[1], [2], [3, 4, 5]]
[[1], [2, 3], [4, 5]]
[[1], [2, 3, 4], [5]]
[[1, 2], [3], [4, 5]]
[[1, 2], [3, 4], [5]]
[[1, 2, 3], [4], [5]]
"""

Step 2:

First we have to transform the group of digits in numbers:

for g in generate(list(range(1,6)), 3):
    print([int(''.join(str(n) for n in n_lst)) for n_lst in g])
"""
[1, 2, 345]
[1, 23, 45]
[1, 234, 5]
[12, 3, 45]
[12, 34, 5]
[123, 4, 5]
"""

And then with reduce and operator perform the arithmetic:
(Although this last sub-step is not really related to your problem)

from functools import reduce
import operator
op = operator.mul

for g in generate(list(range(1,6)), 3):
    converted = [int(''.join(str(n) for n in n_lst)) for n_lst in g]
    print(reduce(op, converted))
"""
690
1035
1170
1620
2040
2460
"""
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, this works well. As per the edit, I'm trying to figure out how to add a loop over all 4 main arithmetic operations. So instead of adding all of them, I could try all permutations of a + b -c, a * b / c, etc. –  Brett Woodward Jan 31 '12 at 23:56
    
@BrettWoodward: It really depends on what operations you want to do, anyway you can put them all in a list or a dict, like: {'+': operator.add, ...} and choose the one you want. I've updated my answer with link to operator and reduce documentation. Anyway if you continue extending your problem, you'll never get it solved! ;) –  Rik Poggi Feb 1 '12 at 0:11
    
Haha, thank you. I should have originally put that in there. –  Brett Woodward Feb 1 '12 at 0:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.