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I've pretty much finished coding a SIC assembler for my systems programming class but I'm stumped on the tokenizing part.

For example, take this line of source code:

The format (free format) is: {LABEL} OPCODE {OPERAND{,X}} {COMMENT}

The curls indicate that the field is optional.

Also, each field must be separated by at least one space or tab.

ENDFIL  	LDA		EOF			COMMENT GOES HERE

The code above is a bit easier to organize but the following snippet is giving me difficulties.

		RSUB				COMMENT GOES HERE

My code will read in the first word of the comment as if it were an OPERAND.

Here is my code:

//tokenize line
    if(currentLine[0] != ' ' && currentLine[0] != '\t')
    {
    	stringstream stream(currentLine);
    	stream >> LABEL;
    	stream >> OPCODE;
    	stream >> OPERAND;
    	stream.str("");


    	if(LABEL.length() > 6 || isdigit(LABEL[0]) || !alphaNum(LABEL))
    	{
    		errors[1] = 1;
    	}
    	else if(LABEL.length() == currentLine.length())
    	{
    		justLabel = true;
    		errors[6] = 1;
    		return;
    	}
    }
    else
    {
    	stringstream stream(currentLine);
    	stream >> OPCODE;
    	stream >> OPERAND;
    	stream.str("");
    }

My professor requires that the assembler be tested with two versions of the source code--one with errors and one without.

The RSUB OPCODE isn't dependent on an OPERAND so I understand that everything after the RSUB OPCODE can be considered a comment, but If the erroneous source code contains a value in the OPERAND field or if an OPCODE which is dependent on an OPERAND is missing the OPERAND value, how do I compensate for this? I need to flag these as errors and print out the erroneous OPERAND value (or lack thereof).

My question is: How do I prevent the comment portion of the code from being considered an OPERAND?

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3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

In the assembly languages (as in other programming languages) that I've seen, there's a delimiter that marks a comment: for example a semicolon before the comment:

ENDFIL LDA EOF ;COMMENT GOES HERE
RSUB ;ANOTHER COMMENT GOES HERE

In your syntax however, can you tell whether something is a comment by the amount of whitespace which precedes it on the line, e.g. by the fact that there are two (not just one) whitespace events between the opcode and the comment?

{LABEL}<whitespace>OPCODE<whitespace>{OPERAND{,X}}<whitespace>{COMMENT}
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That's the thing, there is no delimiter that I could use to differentiate the comment field from the operand field. In reference to whitespace, my professor stated in his spec sheet: "Source code is in free format and the only rule is that each field should be separated by at least a space or tab". I'm now sure how do deal with something like this. –  Mikey D May 26 '09 at 4:40
    
Could it be that you're supposed to know that RSUB doesn't have any operator, and that therefore anything after RSUB must be a comment? –  ChrisW May 26 '09 at 4:47
    
You're probably right. Maybe I'm just over-complicating things. Thanks a lot! –  Mikey D May 26 '09 at 4:59

How can you tell if text in a certain line is an operand or a comment? Is it based on the context? For example, if the OPCODE is "RSUB", then you would know that there is no OPERAND required? Then you should perform some magic on the OPERAND based on what OPCODE is read:

if (OPCODE == "RSUB") OPERAND.clear();
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Right, I wish it were that simple. I need to run erroneous source code as part of my project. If there is an operand present after the RSUB opcode then I need to flag an error and print out the operand. If I clear the operand field then I'd have nothing to print out. –  Mikey D May 26 '09 at 4:43
    
In that case, you might have to count the whitespace between the opcode and the operand. If there is more than one, then you should assume it is a comment –  1800 INFORMATION May 26 '09 at 4:57

Something like this method should do the trick. This is exactly the code I use in my own SIC/XE assembler written in Java.

public static final String[] parseLine(final String s)
{
    /*
     * Line format (space delimited):
     * 
     * label opCode operand(s) comment
     * 
     * label & comment are optional fields.
     * operand(s) are comma delimited.
     * opCode must either be an assembler directive or a program instruction.
     * some opCodes don't take any operands (like RSUB)
     */

    String comment = null, label = null, opCode = null, operand = null;
    ArrayList<Token<TokenType>> tokens = (new SICXE_Lexer<TokenType>()).lex(s);
    int opCodeToken = -1;

    for (int i = 0; i < tokens.size(); i++)
    {
        Token<TokenType> token = tokens.get(i);

        if (SICXE_AssemblerProgram.isOpCode(token.getData()))
        {
            opCodeToken = i;
            opCode = token.getData().trim();
            break;
        }
    }

    if (opCode != null)
    {
        if (opCodeToken > 0)
        {
            label = tokens.get(opCodeToken - 1).getData().trim();
        }

        int remainingTokens = (tokens.size() - (opCodeToken + 1));

        if (remainingTokens > 0)
        {
            boolean doesOpCodeTakeOperands = false;
            int numOperands = 0, operandToken = (opCodeToken + 1);

            if (SICXE_AssemblerProgram.isAssemblerDirective(opCode))
            {
                numOperands = SICXE_AssemblerProgram.DIRECTIVE_TABLE.get(opCode).getNumOperands();
            }

            if (SICXE_AssemblerProgram.isProgramInstruction(opCode))
            {
                numOperands = SICXE_AssemblerProgram.INSTRUCTION_TABLE.get(opCode).getNumOperands();
            }

            if (numOperands > 0)
            {
                doesOpCodeTakeOperands = true;
            }

            if (doesOpCodeTakeOperands)
            {
                operand = tokens.get(operandToken).getData().trim();

                if (remainingTokens > 1)
                {
                    int punctToken = operandToken + 1;
                    Token<TokenType> punct = tokens.get(punctToken);

                    switch (punct.getData())
                    {
                        case ",":
                        case "-":
                        case "+":
                        case "/":
                        case "*":

                            if (remainingTokens > 2)
                            {
                                int argToken = punctToken + 1;
                                Token<TokenType> arg = tokens.get(argToken);

                                operand = operand + punct.getData() + arg.getData();
                            }

                            break;

                        default:

                            break;
                    }
                }
            }

            // TODO: Identify comments.
        }
    }

    String[] result = {label, opCode, operand, comment};
    return result;
}

The return value result is an array of Strings such that result[0] is the label, result[1] is the opcode, result[2] is the operand, and result[3] is the comment. If one of the optional pieces was not present, then the String representing it in the array will be null. I haven't worked out identifying comments 100% yet, but I have been able to overcome the problem you describe of having the first word of the comment be interpreted as the operand when a given opcode doesn't take any operands. Ultimately my solution was to use information stored in the OPTAB to determine which opcodes take operands and which ones do not. I'm using hash tables to store the data for fast search and retrieval since the tables are not meant to be modified. The only tables that should be modified are the symbol tables keeping track of labels and their addresses.

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