Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to get the applications installed in the system using c# code?

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 51 down vote accepted

Iterating through the registry key "SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall" seems to give a comprehensive list of installed applications.

Aside from the example below, you can find a version using Linq here and a similar version to what I've done here.

This is a rough example, you'll probaby want to do something to strip out blank rows like in the 2nd link provided.

string registry_key = @"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall";
using(Microsoft.Win32.RegistryKey key = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(registry_key))
{
    foreach(string subkey_name in key.GetSubKeyNames())
    {
        using(RegistryKey subkey = key.OpenSubKey(subkey_name))
        {
            Console.WriteLine(subkey.GetValue("DisplayName"));
        }
    }
}

Alternatively, you can use WMI as has been mentioned:

ManagementObjectSearcher mos = new ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT * FROM Win32_Product");
foreach(ManagementObject mo in mos.Get())
{
    Console.WriteLine(mo["Name"]);
}

But this is rather slower to execute, and I've heard it may only list programs installed under "ALLUSERS", though that may be incorrect. It also ignores the Windows components & updates, which may be handy for you.

share|improve this answer
11  
It's worth noting that using the WMI Win32_Product class is a bad idea if you plan to run this query repeatedly. See this Microsoft KB article: support.microsoft.com/kb/974524/EN-US The core problem is the (a) Win32_Product is really slow and (b) it generates a "Windows Installer reconfigured the product." event log message for every installed product on your system... every time you run the query. Doh! This article recommends using the Win32reg_AddRemovePrograms class... which isn't present unless you have installed SMS. Doh! So probably better to stick with the registry query. –  Simon Gillbee Mar 5 '10 at 0:00
    
Simon Gillbee's comment should be the accepted answer, or Kirtans! WMI WIN32_Product is not the way to go here, trust me! –  Bob Mar 16 '10 at 23:58
6  
Er, that's why the registry example is first in my answer. WMI was presented simply as an alternative solution, and even there I state "this is rather slower to execute" and other drawbacks. Read the answer from the beginning. ;) –  Xiaofu Mar 17 '10 at 7:42
    
I don't want whole list , I just need some selected install programs so what can i do for that . Thank you –  Dhru 'soni Jan 21 at 10:16

Here is a complete code for searching for Installed application or a program. 100% work on 32 and 64 bit os!!!

http://mdb-blog.blogspot.com/2010/12/c-check-if-programapplication-is.html

share|improve this answer
1  
What about rude applications that don't write their uninstall info to the registry? (they still exist, unfortunately) –  Piskvor Sep 1 '10 at 11:38
3  
I don't think you can do anything about such applications. Consider an application that was just a single executable without even a shortcut to it in the Start Menu. There's no way for Windows to know about them. Now, if a shortcut was then created for it, it doesn't really change anything; Windows still can't know any real details about it. You MIGHT even say that program isn't even installed. One definition of installed might be "Program is runnable with appropriate 'Start program' links", and another might be the above and "Includes modify and uninstall details". –  Tyler Collier Mar 17 '11 at 4:55
    
That link is broken. Here is a new one: mdb-blog.blogspot.com –  Mikhail Apr 22 '11 at 8:37
    
Try this now: mdb-blog.blogspot.com/2010/12/… –  ferventcoder Jun 8 '12 at 21:14
    
Thanks @cf Blogpost! Precisely what I'm looking for! –  Ryan Penfold Nov 21 '13 at 12:12

You can take a look at this article. It makes use of registry to read the list of installed applications.

public void GetInstalledApps()
{
    string uninstallKey = @"SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall";
    using (RegistryKey rk = Registry.LocalMachine.OpenSubKey(uninstallKey))
    {
        foreach (string skName in rk.GetSubKeyNames())
        {
            using (RegistryKey sk = rk.OpenSubKey(skName))
            {
                try
                {
                    lstInstalled.Items.Add(sk.GetValue("DisplayName"));
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                { }
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want whole list , I just need some selected install programs so what can i do for that . Thank you –  Dhru 'soni Jan 21 at 10:15

Might I suggest you take a look at WMI (Windows Management Instrumentation). If you add the System.Management reference to your C# project, you'll gain access to the class `ManagementObjectSearcher', which you will probably find useful.

There are various WMI Classes for Installed Applications, but if it was installed with Windows Installer, then the Win32_Product class is probably best suited to you.

ManagementObjectSearcher s = new ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT * FROM Win32_Product");
share|improve this answer

Use Windows Installer API!

It allows to make reliable enumeration of all programs. Registry is not reliable, but WMI is heavyweight.

share|improve this answer

it's worth noting that the Win32_Product WMI class represents products as they are installed by Windows Installer[http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa394378%28v=vs.85%29.aspx].not every application use windows installer

however "SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall" represents applications for 32 bit. For 64 bit you also need to traverse "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall" and since not every software has a 64 bit version the total applications installed are a union of keys on both locations that have "UninstallString" Value with them.

but the best options remains the same .traverse registry keys is a better approach since every application have an entry in registry[including the ones in Windows Installer].however the registry method is insecure as if anyone removes the corresponding key then you will not know the Application entry.On the contrary Altering the HKEY_Classes_ROOT\Installers is more tricky as it is linked with licensing issues such as Microsoft office or other products. for more robust solution you can always combine registry alternative with the WMI.

share|improve this answer

Your best bet is to use WMI. Specifically the Win32_Product class.

share|improve this answer
1  
Maybe rather slower ? –  Kiquenet Oct 9 '12 at 10:23

Iterate through "HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Uninstall" keys and check their "DisplayName" values.

share|improve this answer

I used Nicks approach - I needed to check whether the Remote Tools for Visual Studio are installed or not, it seems a bit slow, but in a seperate thread this is fine for me. - here my extended code:

    private bool isRdInstalled() {
        ManagementObjectSearcher p = new ManagementObjectSearcher("SELECT * FROM Win32_Product");
        foreach (ManagementObject program in p.Get()) {
            if (program != null && program.GetPropertyValue("Name") != null && program.GetPropertyValue("Name").ToString().Contains("Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Remote Debugger")) {
                return true;
            }
            if (program != null && program.GetPropertyValue("Name") != null) {
                Trace.WriteLine(program.GetPropertyValue("Name"));
            }
        }
        return false;
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.