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Say for example the app was like a music album where you can buy single songs for 0.99 each, or you get a discount for buying the whole thing at once at 7.99. With in-app purchase, how do you handle a scenario where the user buys 3 or 4 single songs for 0.99 each, and now 7.99 is now more expensive than the remaining songs combined?

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up vote -2 down vote accepted

The only way I can think of is to create a new store item for every price point. Then you would just surface the store item to the user that corresponded to the number of tracks they'd already bought. This would probably be a huge pain in the ass, but I don't know of any automated way to handle it.

In other words, let's say your album has 5 tracks. What you currently have is:

$0.99 Track1
$0.99 Track2
$0.99 Track3
$0.99 Track4
$0.99 Track5
$4.99 EntireAlbum

What you would need is:

$0.99 Track1
$0.99 Track2
$0.99 Track3
$0.99 Track4
$0.99 Track5
$4.99 EntireAlbum
$3.99 EntireAlbumAlreadyOwn1
$2.99 EntireAlbumAlreadyOwn2
$1.99 EntireAlbumAlreadyOwn3
$0.99 EntireAlbumAlreadyOwn4

You would then yourself have to determine which item to offer the user, based on your own records of what they've already purchased.

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That could almost work, small problem with only being able to use prices that end in ".99" so 2 songs at 0.99 = 1.98, less than 1.99, and changing the prices later would be quite an ordeal. But it might be the way to go. Thanks. – meggar Feb 1 '12 at 0:08
    
@meggar - Yeah, keep in mind though that technically it is "tiers", and users in different countries will pay different amounts that only approximate the USD value. So even without this issue you're facing, the actual amount of money you receive for an item has a range of variability that is much larger than 1 or 2 cents. – DougW Feb 1 '12 at 2:31

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